Tag Archives: paranormal

Dr. Bruce Maccabee – The FBI / UFO Connection

From Openminds.tv:

Dr. Bruce Maccabee – The FBI UFO Connection – April 8, 2013

Dr. Bruce Maccabee is a retired optical physicist, and has been one of the premier UFO researchers in the last few decades. His accomplishments in this field are too long to list here, but in particular, Dr. Maccabee was the first to receive the FBI’s UFO files via a FOIA request in the late 1970s. A FBI story on a memo in these files has been getting a lot of attention lately. In this story, the FBI referenced having released the UFO memo in the 70s, they were referring to Dr. Maccabee. Even though this is the case, no one in the media has bothered talking to Dr. Maccabee about the memo, so we are.

In this edition of Open Minds UFO Radio, we talk about how the media has gotten this story wrong, Dr. Maccabee’s opinion of this now infamous “Hottel” UFO memo, and what insights the FBI’s UFO files give us into their investigations into the subject.

For more on Dr. Maccabee’s work, visit his website at: http://brumac.8k.com.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ufo_radio/2013/04/08/dr-bruce-maccabee-the-fbi-ufo-connection-1

Bruce Maccabee is one of the premier mainstream UFO scientists of the past four decades, second perhaps behind Jacques Vallee and Stanton Friedman.

His accomplishments are many and his credibility can be seconded by the U.S. Navy. Nobody has as much experience when it comes to verifying or debunking UFO photographs and films.

Dr. Bruce Maccabee – The FBI UFO Connection – April 8, 2013

CIA Psychic Agent Ingo Swann Passes Away

From STARpod.us:

BY EDITOR’S NEWS DESK STAFF


Sources are reporting that CIA superstar psychic spy Ingo Swann, known as the father of America’s secret remote viewing program, has died.

Swann’s story of recruitment by a covert black ops group in the 1970s was the inspiration for author Gary S. Bekkum’s book “To the Moon and Back, With Love.”

According to one of Swann’s psychic students, former U.S. government spy Paul Smith, “At the time of his death, on February 1, 2013, Ingo was well along in the process of creating a new book featuring his marvelous art work.”

Smith writes:

Supported by the military and intelligence communities, Ingo worked through the program at SRI-International to not only explore the boundary conditions of remote viewing, the consciousness-based skill that he had discovered and developed, but he used it operationally to discover some of the secrets America’s erstwhile Cold War opponents were trying to hide.

Here is an excerpt from the book “To the Moon and Back, With Love” about Ingo Swann’s encounter with a mysterious black ops leader called Mr. Axelrod and otherworldly beings on the lunar surface.

Government consultant Ingo Swann’s tale of covert extraterrestrial activity on the moon takes on a new twist, now that the CIA STAR GATE documents support many of his claims.


3 August 2006

(STARpod.us) — This is the bizarre true tale of Ingo Swann’s psychic work for the U.S government, at various agencies including the CIA and the DIA (now substantiated by the CIA release of roughly two thirds of the existing STAR GATE documents) and his personal allegations of a mysterious black operation that first contacted him during the peak of CIA sponsored testing at the Stanford Research Institute.

If Ingo Swann is to be believed, and this coming from a man with top secret clearance that in his day briefed and trained officers from the U.S. Air Force, the Defense Intelligence Agency, INSCOM, and many others too numerous to mention, then there is some truth to the rumors of an otherworldly intelligence working behind the scenes here on Earth. Not only are they already here, according to Swann’s testimony from a rare out-of-print book, self-published in 1998, but they are building something on the far side of the moon.

And they are not friendly.

The truth is stranger than fiction, and this story is guaranteed to stretch the imagination right back into reality. For Ingo Swann, the turning point leading into the cloak and dagger world of deep black ops and weird requests for psychic surveillance of the moon and beyond began in early 1975. When Swann published his tale in 1998, most of the CIA and DIA classified documents from the secret STAR GATE program were still unavailable to the general public. As this story goes to press, in the summer of 2006, more than 80,000 pages of documents are close at hand here at STARstream Research, including the results of medical and psychological tests conducted on Mr. Swann as a result of his CIA sponsored testing while working with SRI: The Stanford Research Institute, in the 1970′s.

The CIA STAR GATE Program

In the early 1970′s concerns began to float about the various intelligence agencies over a psychic war gap with the Soviet Union. Unknown to the general public, the Soviets were busy exploring fringe science: application of the dark shadow of the paranormal world for espionage.

Swann’s abilities had been tracked for some time, but they really attracted the powers that be in Langley with the recording of an apparent perturbation of delicate test equipment by Swann’s mental perception. In addition to disturbing the output of this sensitive instrument, Swann was able to produce a rough description of the device, which he had never seen previously.

In a letter dated June 27, 1972, Dr. Hal Puthoff of SRI wrote, “At the suggestion of Russell Targ I am writing you about an observation in the laboratory involving one Ingo Swann, a New York artist … An interesting side light of the experiment was that Ingo was able to describe rather well what the interior of the device looked like, apparently with some form of direct observation.” Although redacted, it is likely that the recipient of this letter was at the CIA. Apparently sponsorship of Dr. Puthoff’s interest in Swann’s mental interaction with the test equipment followed quickly.

Among the STAR GATE files is a Stanford Research Institute (SRI) Technical Memorandum dated 22 February, 1973, prepared by Dr. Hal Puthoff and Russell Targ, Contract Number 1471(S)73 and tagged by CIA/ORD # 1416-73:

“A program in biofield measurements was initiated in July, 1972 with a preliminary experiment with Mr. [Ingo] Swann. In this work using a shielded magnetometer, Mr. Swann apparently demonstrated an ability to increase and decrease at will the magnetic field within a superconducting magnetic shield. This experiment made use of an existing facility and we have confidence that Mr. Swann had no prior knowledge of either the apparatus or of our intended experiment.”

An August, 1972 memo to the Chief of TSD/BAB at the CIA notes that “[name redacted] and somebody named [redacted] from [CIA] Life Sciences are planning a trip to the West Coast on 11 August, when they will meet Ingo Swann and have a chance to watch him flex his sphincter … Life Sciences is planning on forming a coordinating committee to work on ESP and the data that is coming in …”

When we contacted the unnamed former officer from CIA Life Sciences, he confirmed the authenticity of the document, but denied any knowledge of Swann’s tale.

An undated draft memorandum from Deputy Director for Operations William Colby, addressed to the “Director of Central Intelligence,” reveals the clandestine nature of CIA involvement in research using human subjects:

“Recently, two individuals, Mr. Uri Geller and Mr. Ingo Swann, appear to have demonstrated certain of these abilities [paraphysical effects] under controlled laboratory conditions. The abilities of these individuals (unwitting of Agency [CIA] sponsorship) are being submitted to a serious scientific investigation, part of which is being supported by the above mentioned project.”

An anonymous source, working in the alternative energy and transportation industry recently commented, “Actually, they became interested in Swann when he RV’ed [psychically remote viewed] some of their well-hidden deep underground vaults, and the contents thereof. This was when they approached SRI because they were finally truly scared about the reality of RV [psychic remote viewing] as a tool in the hands of the Soviets.”

Based upon the available records in STAR GATE, no one seems to have seriously considered that all of these manifestations of the impossible were strong indications of interference in human affairs by higher intelligence with more powerful technologies at their disposal. Or did they? Swann’s account in his book suggests that someone lurking in the shadows was paying very close attention; someone whose reach included the often super-secret work done at SRI.

Arthur C. Clarke once said and I’m paraphrasing here, “Advanced extraterrestrial technology would be indistinguishable from magic.”

Now, I’m not sure Ingo Swann actually made mind contact with ETIs on the far side of the Moon or not and it certainly isn’t outside the realm of possibility.

My question is, “Why would an advanced civilization interfere with us in any meaningful way and what is it’s purpose?”

Even if they were interdimensional in nature, the same questions apply.

In the end, Ingo Swann had great influence on the U.S. Government via the work he did with the CIA and in the end proved there are pathways through other dimensions in which communications and observations are performed.

Just ask DARPA.

Of the Multiverse, Reality and Fantasy

When it comes to the Multiverse, several folks claim it’s all fantasy and let’s face it, the idea of several Universes just immeasurable millimeters away from our very noses reads like Alice in Wonderland or The Wizard of Oz.

But to Michael Hanlon, not only does the multiverse seem like the ultimate reality, it’s populated with any kind of reality that’s ever been theorized.

And then some.

Our understanding of the fundamental nature of reality is changing faster than ever before. Gigantic observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope on the Paranal Mountain in Chile are probing the furthest reaches of the cosmos. Meanwhile, with their feet firmly on the ground, leviathan atom-smashers such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under the Franco-Swiss border are busy untangling the riddles of the tiny quantum world.

Myriad discoveries are flowing from these magnificent machines. You may have seen Hubble’s extraordinary pictures. You will probably have heard of the ‘exoplanets’, worlds orbiting alien suns, and you will almost certainly have heard about the Higgs Boson, the particle that imbues all others with mass, which the LHC found this year. But you probably won’t know that (if their findings are taken to their logical conclusion) these machines have also detected hints that Elvis lives, or that out there, among the flaming stars and planets, are unicorns, actual unicorns with horns on their noses. There’s even weirder stuff, too: devils and demons; gods and nymphs; places where Hitler won the Second World War, or where there was no war at all. Places where the most outlandish fantasies come true. A weirdiverse, if you will. Most bizarre of all, scientists are now seriously discussing the possibility that our universe is a fake, a thing of smoke and mirrors.

All this, and more, is the stuff of the multiverse, the great roller-coaster rewriting of reality that has overturned conventional cosmology in the last decade or two. The multiverse hypothesis is the idea that what we see in the night sky is just an infinitesimally tiny sliver of a much, much grander reality, hitherto invisible. The idea has become so mainstream that it is now quite hard to find a cosmologist who thinks there’s nothing in it. This isn’t the world of the mystics, the pointy-hat brigade who see the Age of Aquarius in every Hubble image. On the contrary, the multiverse is the creature of Astronomers Royal and tenured professors at Cambridge and Cornell.

First, some semantics. The old-fashioned, pre-multiverse ‘universe’ is defined as the volume of spacetime, about 90 billion light years across, that holds all the stars we can see (those whose light has had enough time to reach us since the Big Bang). This ‘universe’ contains about 500 sextillion stars — more than the grains of sand on all the beaches of Earth — organised into about 80 billion galaxies. It is, broadly speaking, what you look up at on a clear night. It is unimaginably vast, incomprehensibly old and, until recently, assumed to be all that there is. Yet recent discoveries from telescopes and particle colliders, coupled with new mathematical insights, mean we have to discard this ‘small’ universe in favour of a much grander reality. The old universe is as a gnat atop an elephant in comparison with the new one. Moreover, the new terrain is so strange that it might be beyond human understanding.

That hasn’t stopped some bold thinkers from trying, of course. One such is Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University in New York. He turned his gaze upon the multiverse in his latest book, The Hidden Reality (2011). According to Greene, it now comes in no fewer than nine ‘flavours’, which, he says, can ‘all work together’.

The simplest version he calls the ‘quilted multiverse’. This arises from the observation that the matter and energy we can see through our most powerful telescopes have a certain density. In fact, they are just dense enough to permit a gravitationally ‘flat’ universe that extends forever, rather than looping back on itself. We know that a repulsive field pervaded spacetime just after the Big Bang: it was what caused everything to fly apart in the way that it did. If that field was large enough, we must conclude that infinite space contains infinite repetitions of the ‘Hubble volume’, the volume of space, matter and energy that is observable from Earth.

There is another you, sitting on an identical Earth, about 10 to the power of 10 to the power of 120 light years away

If this is correct, there might — indeed, there must — be innumerable dollops of interesting spacetime beyond our observable horizon. There will be enough of these patchwork, or ‘pocket’, universes for every single arrangement of fundamental particles to occur, not just once but an infinite number of times. It is sometimes said that, given a typewriter and enough time, a monkey will eventually come up with Hamlet. Similarly, with a fixed basic repertoire of elementary particles and an infinity of pocket universes, you will come up with everything.

In such a case, we would expect some of these patchwork universes to be identical to this one. There is another you, sitting on an identical Earth, about 10 to the power of 10 to the power of 120 light years away. Other pocket universes will contain entities of almost limitless power and intelligence. If it is allowed by the basic physical laws (which, in this scenario, will be constant across all universes), it must happen. Thus there are unicorns, and thus there are godlike beings. Thus there is a place where your evil twin lives. In an interview I asked Greene if this means there are Narnias out there, Star Trek universes, places where Elvis got a personal trainer and lived to his 90s (as has been suggested by Michio Kaku, a professor of theoretical physics at the City University of New York). Places where every conscious being is in perpetual torment. Heavens and hells. Yes, it does, it seems. And does he find this troubling? ‘Not at all,’ he replied. ‘Exciting. Well, that’s what I say in this universe, at least.’

The quilted multiverse is only the beginning. In 1999 in Los Angeles, the Russian émigré physicist Andrei Linde invited a group of journalists, myself included, to watch a fancy computer simulation. The presentation illustrated Linde’s own idea of an ‘inflationary multiverse’. In this version, the rapid period of expansion that followed the Big Bang did not happen only once. Rather, like Trotsky’s hopes for Communism, it was a constant work in progress. An enormous network of bubble universes ensued, separated by even more unimaginable gulfs than those that divide the ‘parallel worlds’ of the quilted multiverse.

Here’s another one. String Theory, the latest attempt to reconcile quantum physics with gravity, has thrown up a scenario in which our universe is a sort of sheet, which cosmologists refer to as a ‘brane’, stacked up like a page in a book alongside tens of trillions of others. These universes are not millions of light years away; indeed, they are hovering right next to you now.

That doesn’t mean we can go there, any more than we can reach other universes in the quantum multiverse, yet another ‘flavour’. This one derives from the notion that the probability waves of classical quantum mechanics are a hard-and-fast reality, not just some mathematical construct. This is the world of Schrödinger’s cat, both alive and dead; here, yet not here. Einstein called it ‘spooky’, but we know quantum physics is right. If it wasn’t, the computer on which you are reading this would not work.

The ‘many worlds’ interpretation of quantum physics was first proposed in 1957 by Hugh Everett III (father of Mark Everett, frontman of the band Eels). It states that all quantum possibilities are, in fact, real. When we roll the dice of quantum mechanics, each possible result comes true in its own parallel timeline. If this sounds mad, consider its main rival: the idea that ‘reality’ results from the conscious gaze. Things only happen, quantum states only resolve themselves, because we look at them. As Einstein is said to have asked, with some sarcasm, ‘would a sidelong glance by a mouse suffice?’ Given the alternative, the prospect of innumerable branching versions of history doesn’t seem like such a terrible bullet to bite.

There is a non-trivial probability that we, our world, and even the vast extensions of spacetime are no more than a gigantic computer simulation

Stranger still is the holographic multiverse, which implies that ‘our world’ — not just stars and galaxies but you and your bedroom, your career problems and last night’s dinner — are mere flickers of phenomena taking place on an inaccessible plane of reality. The entire perceptible realm would amount to nothing more than shapes in a shadow theatre. This sounds like pure mysticism; indeed, it sounds almost uncannily like Plato’s allegory of the cave. Yet it has some theoretical support: Stephen Hawking relies on the idea in his solution to the Black Hole information paradox, which is the riddle of what happens to information destroyed as it crosses the Event Horizon of a dark star.

String theory affords other possibilities, and yet more layers of multiverse. But the strangest (and yet potentially simplest) of all is the idea that we live in a multiverse that is fake. According to an argument first posited in 2001 by Nick Bostrom, professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford, there is a non-trivial probability that we, our world, and even the vast extensions of spacetime that we saw in the first multiverse scenarios, are no more than a gigantic computer simulation.

The idea that what we perceive as reality is no more than a construct is quite old, of course. The Simulation Argument, as it is called, has features in common with the many layers of reality posited by some traditional Buddhist thinking. The notion of a ‘pretend’ universe, on the other hand, crops up in fiction and film — examples include the Matrix franchise and The Truman Show (1998). The thing that makes Bostrom’s idea unique is the basis on which he argues for it: a series of plausible assumptions, plus a statistical calculation.

In essence, the case goes like this. If it turns out to be possible to use computers to simulate a ‘universe’ — even just part of one — with self-aware sentient entities in it, the chances are that someone, somewhere, will do this. Furthermore, as Bostrom explained it to me, ‘Look at the way our computer simulations work. When we run a simulation of, say, the weather or of a nuclear explosion [the most complex computer simulations to date performed], we do not run them once, but many thousands, millions — even billions — of times. If it turns out that it is possible to simulate — or, more correctly, generate — conscious awareness in a machine, it would be surprising if this were done only once. More likely it would be done countless billions of times over the lifetime of the advanced civilisation that is interested in such a project.’

If we start running simulations, as we soon might, given our recent advances in computing power, this would be very strong evidence that we ourselves live in a simulation. If we conclude that we are, we have some choices. I’ll say more on those below.

First, we come to the most bizarre scenario of all. Brian Greene calls it the ‘ultimate multiverse’. In essence, it says that everything that can be true is true. At first glance, that seems a bit like the quilted multiverse we met earlier. According to that hypothesis, all physical possibilities are realised because there is so much stuff out there and so much space for it to do things in.

Those who argue that this ‘isn’t science’ are on the back foot. The Large Hadron Collider could find direct evidence for aspects of string theory within the decade

The ultimate multiverse supercharges that idea: it says that anything that is logically possible (as defined by mathematics rather than by physical reality) is actually real. Furthermore, and this is the important bit, it says that you do not necessarily need the substrate of physical matter for this reality to become incarnate. According to Max Tegmark, professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the ‘Mathematical Universe Hypothesis’ can be stated as follows: ‘all structures that exist mathematically also exist physically‘. Tegmark uses a definition of mathematical existence formulated by the late German mathematician David Hilbert: it is ‘merely the freedom from contradiction’. Hence, if it is possible, it exists. We can allow unicorns but not arbitrary, logic-defying magic.

I haven’t given the many theories of the multiverse much thought in the past few years just because of the different iterations of it.

Although there is some mysticism tied into the quantum physics theory and ultimately the many theories of the Multiverse(s), the “real” world applications of computers ( and ultimately quantum computing ), quantum teleporting and the experiments performed on the Large Hadron Collider in Europe does indeed put critics of the many variations of the multiverse theories “on the back foot.”

Who’s to say there’s no such thing as a mysterious Universe!

World next door

 

Jim Moseley, Ufology Pioneer and Magazine Publisher, Passes into the Veil

Fortean explorer and UFO humorist Jim Moseley died of cancer this past Friday night ( 11/16 ) at the age of 81.

I never talked to, emailed, posted a reply or blogged Mr. Moseley at all since I’ve been posting on the Internet over the past five years, but I’ve listened to him and Gene Steinberg banter on Steinberg’s Paracast radio show enough times to know that he was a very fascinating and interesting folk character in his own right and that his influence will be felt in the UFO community forever and his type of humor will be greatly missed:

Fortean friend, ufology humorist, and writer James W. Moseley, 81, died Friday night, November 16, 2012. He passed away at a Key West, Florida, hospital, several months after being diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus.

Upon hearing of the death of Moseley, Anomalist Books publisher and editor Patrick Huyghe said: “He was one of the last remaining old timers from the golden age of flying saucers. Goodbye, Jim.”

I, Loren Coleman, first met James W. Moseley (“Jim” to his friends) when he, John Keel, and I were speaking at a Fortfest in the D.C. area, in 1973. The most vivid memory I have of that time is sitting with these two gentlemen in the dark and shabby lobby of a motel, listening to the foremost scholars of ufology decide what they would do that evening. I recall politely excusing myself to finetune my next day’s presentation, as they skipped off, by foot, across the multilane highway, to visit a nearby striptease joint. And thus I was introduced to the braintrust of ufology, and knew what the end would look like – some sort of cosmic mix of humor and nudity galore!

For years, according to only a few readers, Moseley too frequently posted photographs of large-breasted women in his humorous ufology newsletter, Saucer Smear, confusing people who wished to claim that Moseley was gay, even though he was not, just because others wish to remain closeted for years.

Did it matter what people thought? Ufology historian and Moseley friend Jerome Clark wrote me: “Well, it did matter. It mattered to Jim, who was not gay and who did not like it when people spread such speculation.”

But it went beyond breasts: In the May 10, 2004, issue of Saucer Smear, Moseley highlighted the republishing of a book on three alien monsters raping a woman named Barbara Turner in her bedroom.
Actually, it was quite obvious. Moseley was a comic, extremely interested in women and sex, and loved to be the center-of-attention. Certainly, his lifestyle was secretive to some. For almost thirty years, Moseley lived in Florida.
Moseley with a large poster of marine treasure hunter Mel Fisher.
 

In 1984, Moseley established an antiques store in Key West, Florida. He also made money in real estate. In 1992, Moseley donated his Peruvian material to the Graves Museum of Archaeology and Natural History, located in Dania, Florida, where it is on permanent display.

James Moseley was a pivotal chronicler of a now-famed mystery that issued from his interest in ancient Peruvian artifacts. It is to be recalled that the Nazca Lines were first discovered by the Peruvian archaeologist Toribio Mejia Xesspe, who spotted them when hiking through the foothills in 1927. He discussed them at a conference in Lima in 1939. Maria Reiche, a German-born mathematician and archaeologist, first studied and set out to preserve the Nazca Lines in 1940. Paul Kosok, a historian from Long Island University, is credited as the first scholar to seriously study the Nazca Lines in the USA, on site in Peru, in 1940-41. But it was Moseley who first wrote about the Nazca Lines as an intriguing Fortean phenomena in Fate Magazine, in October 1955, suggesting a mysterious origin, long before they interested alternative writers such as Erich von Däniken (1968), Henri Stierlin (1983) and Gerald Hawkins (1990).

More on the Popocatepetl Volcano “Cylinder”

From Inexplicata:

ABC.COM.PY

http://www.abc.com.py/ciencia/mexico-ovni-en-crater-de-montana-471502.html

Date:
10.31.12

Mexico: UFO in a Mountain Crater?

MEXICO (ANSA
News Agency) An alleged elongated object entered the crater of the Popocatepetl
Volcano, 65 kilometers distant from the Mexican capital, causing astonishment
and confusion among experts and the public alike.

On October 25 at 20:45
local time, a camera from the TELEVISA TV network that monitors activity in the
giant volcano captured the image and immediately unleashed a firestorm of
discussions. The object’s measurements would have been 1 kilometer long by 200
meters wide, flying at a speed greater than that of an airliner, according to
scientific estimates.

However, the majority of experts, like astronomer
Julieta Fierro, a renowned science popularizer, took a more skeptical
stance. Fierro believes that it cannot be said for sure if the object fell
within the crater or if it is in fact “a galaxy 20,000 million light years away.
It could be something incredibly distant moving behind the Earth,” she
said.

A similar opinion was voiced by William Lee, a member of the
Mexican Academy of Sciences, who said it was “a video error, given that there
was no visible interaction between the object and the atmosphere and gases
emanating from the volcano.”

Raul Rivera of the Servicio
Meteorologico Nacional (National Weather Service) said it was “an object whose
composition is simply unknown to us.”

[A note from Prof. Ana Luisa
Cid
: “Regarding the story of the cylindrical UFO in the volcano, it is worth
noting that it was recorded by the TELEVISA camera (not the same as the one used
by CENAPRED). I am pointing this out because some researchers have published
erroneous reports, thinking it is the same camera with the same specifications.
They further compound their error by saying CENAPRED takes photos every 30
seconds and then joins them to form a time lapse. The truth is that “CENAPRED
used an Pelco brand remotely controlled analog camera. It is a video camera that
takes pictures every 2 seconds approximately before placing them on the
Internet.” This information was directly provided to me by Ing. Gilberto
Castelán, responsible for monitoring maintenance and
instrumentation.”
)

Or it could have been a telescopic “hologram” that some ET civilization is using to explore our volcano systems from a nice, safe distance? Like from 50 to 100 light-years away?

Like what we plan to do in a primitive way using the “Square Kilometer Array?”

Mexico: More on the Popocatepetl “Cylinder”

There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now…

The above title is a quote attributed to William Thomson, Lord Kelvin in the year 1900. But it is not what Thomson said. It really was said by Albert A. Michaelson, another great 19th Century physicist.

So what is the meaning of all this stuff? The fact that whenever a great scientist(s) proclaims that in our reality, there already has been all that has been discovered in Nature? That the self-same scientists are usually wrong when making such claims?

Yes to the above. And here in the early 21st Century, the more things change, the more they stay the same.:

Physicist Sean Carroll, speaking at James Randi’s “The Amazing Meeting”, tells how anomalous phenomenon simply can’t happen because the laws of physics are completely understood:

There are actually three points I try to hit here. The first is that the laws of physics underlying everyday life are completely understood. There is an enormous amount that we don’t know about how the world works, but we actually do know the basic rules underlying atoms and their interactions — enough to rule out telekinesis, life after death, and so on. The second point is that those laws are dysteleological — they describe a universe without intrinsic meaning or purpose, just one that moves from moment to moment.

The third point — the important one, and the most subtle — is that the absence of meaning “out there in the universe” does not mean that people can’t live meaningful lives. Far from it. It simply means that whatever meaning our lives might have must be created by us, not given to us by the natural or supernatural world. There is one world that exists, but many ways to talk about; many stories we can imagine telling about that world and our place within it, without succumbing to the temptation to ignore the laws of nature. That’s the hard part of living life in a natural world, and we need to summon the courage to face up to the challenge.

There’s a lot of elements to like about the talk, and Sean Carroll is no doubt a smarter man than me, but the pre-emptive debunking of apparent anomalies in science (such as parapsychology and the evidence for the survival of consciousness) – in effect, saying that we need not even test these anomalies because the laws of physics are already understood and preclude them – left me thinking of another well-known scientist’s thoughts on the apparent completeness of science. Considering the alternative scientific viewpoints from the likes of physicist Henry Stapp, on theoretical explorations of the possibility of an afterlife, and Dean Radin’s recent work on conscious influence in the famous double-slit experiment, the famous (though possibly apocryphal) fin de siècle quote of Lord Kelvin immediately came to mind when contemplating Carroll’s pronouncements:

There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now. All that remains is more and more precise measurement.

Within a few years, science was turned on its head by relativity, and followed by quantum mechanics. One can only wonder if current-day anomalies, such as those explored by parapsychologiests, might one-day lead to some similar revolution, this time involving consciousness or information as primary elements of the cosmos.

Although Greg is understandably mistaken about Lord Kelvin’s quote, he is spot on about Carroll’s proclamations and I am surprised that Carroll actually made such claims.

Well, maybe not. I guess it just shows the inherent uber-conversatism in science.

But in the general population, not so much.

I think we might be ready for a new physics that breaks Mankind out into the Universe and answers some of our questions about Consciousness, UFOs, ghosts and other paranormal activities.

http://www.youtube.com/embed/X5Fel1VKEN8

The Laws of Physics Are Completely Understood

William Thomson, Lord Kelvin Quotes

As always, many hat tips to Greg Taylor’s Daily Grail.

Is Ufology a Religion?

I am not the first to ask this and certainly not the last. In fact over at Micah Hank’s Mysterious Universe blog, researcher and author Nick Redfern asks the very same question and entertains some very interesting thoughts:

A few days ago, I wrote a Top 10-themed post at my World of Whatever blog on what I personally see as some of the biggest faults of Ufology. It was a post with which many agreed, others found amusing, and some hated (the latter, probably, because they recognized dubious character traits and flaws that were too close to home, and, as a result, got all moody and defensive. Whatever.). But, regardless of what people thought of the article, it prompted one emailer to ask me: “What do you think of the future for Ufology?” Well, that’s a very good question. Here’s my thoughts…

First and foremost, I don’t fear, worry or care about Ufology not existing in – let’s say, hypothetically – 100 years from now. Or even 200 years. In some format, I think that as a movement, it will still exist. I guess my biggest concern is that nothing will have changed by then, aside from the field having become even more dinosaur-like and stuck in its ways than it is today, still filled with influential souls who loudly demand we adhere to the Extra-Terrestrial Hypothesis and nothing else, still droning on about Roswell, still obsessed with what might be going on at Area 51, still debating on what Kenneth Arnold saw, and still pondering on what really happened at Rendlesham.

Ufology’s biggest problem also happens to be what made the Ramones the greatest band that ever existed: never-changing. For the latter, it worked perfectly. If, like me, you liked the mop-topped, super-fast punks in the beginning, then you still like them when they disbanded in 1996. Throughout their career, they looked the same, sounded the same, and were the same. For them, it worked very well. For Ufology, not so well. Not at all.

The reality is that 65 years after our Holy Lord and Master (Sir Kenneth of Arnoldshire) saw whatever it was that he saw on that fateful June 24, 1947 day, Ufology has been static and unchanging. It has endorsed and firmly embraced the ETH not as the belief-system which it actually is, but as a likely fact. And Ufology insists on doing so in stubborn, mule-like fashion. In that sense, Ufology has become a religion. And organized religion is all about upholding unproved old belief-systems and presenting them as hard fact, despite deep, ongoing changes in society, trends and culture. Just like Ufology.

If Ufology is to play a meaningful role in the future, then it needs to focus far less on personal beliefs and wanting UFOs to be extraterrestrial, and far more on admitting that the ETH is just one theory of many – and, while not discarding the ETH, at least moving onwards, upwards and outwards. Can you imagine if the major UFO conference of the year in the United States had a group of speakers where the presentations were on alien-abductions and DMT; the Aleister Crowley-Lam controversy; Ufological synchronicities; and the UFO-occult connection? And Roswell, Area 51, and Flying Triangles weren’t even in sight at all?

Well, imagine is just about all you’ll be able to do, as it ain’t gonna happen anytime soon!

While such matters do, of course, occasionally get mentioned on the UFO-themed lecture circuit today, the fact is that mainstream Ufology (and specifically mainstream ufological organizations, where more time is spent on deciding what utterly ridiculous title everyone will have than on doing investigations) will largely not touch such matters, or even consider them ripe for debate at their conferences. Why? Simple: they want everything to be as it was in the “Good Old Days” of the past. Well, tough: the past is gone, and no-one has succeeded in proving the ETH. So, give the highly alternative theories – and theorists – a chance for a change.

“Nooooo!” cries the old brigade. For them, that won’t work at all, because they don’t want to see the ETH-themed domain that has been so carefully nurtured for decades infected and infiltrated by matters ignorantly perceived as being of a “Hocus Pocus” nature. What they do want is crashed UFOs; aliens taking soil samples; landing traces; abductions undertaken to steal our DNA, etc, etc, blah, blah. Or, as it is scientifically and technically called: Outdated Old School Shit. They don’t want talk of altered states; mind-expanding and entity-invoking drugs; conjured-up beings from other realms; or rites, rituals and manifested Tulpas.

What this stubborn attitude demonstrates is: (A) a fear of change; (B) a fear of having been on the wrong track for decades; and (C) a fear of the unknown. Yes: mainstream, old-time Ufology lives in fear. It should be living in a state of strength. And it should be a strength born of a willingness to address everything, not just the stuff that some conference organizer thinks will attract the biggest audience. But Ufology commits the biggest crime of all: being weak and unsure in the face of new concepts and making like an ostrich when it encounters sand. Actually, I’m wrong. Ufology commits an even bigger crime as it coasts aimlessly along like an empty ship on the ocean waves: it avoids the alternative theories knowingly and fully aware of the long-term, and potentially disastrous, consequences that a one-sided, biased approach may very well provoke for the field.

If Ufology is to move ahead,  find answers, and actually have some meaningful future, it needs to totally do away with belief systems and recognize that every belief is just a theory, an hypothesis, an idea. And that’s all. Ufologists need to embrace alternative ideas and paradigms, since many suggest far easier, and more successful, ways of understanding the various phenomena that comprise the UFO enigma than endlessly studying radar-blips, gun-camera footage, FOIA documentation, and blurry photos.

Should Ufology fail to seize the growing challenge it already faces, then will it die or fade away? Nope, it will still be here and here, popping up now and again. Not unlike a nasty, itchy rash picked up in the “private room” at the local strip-joint on a Friday night that never quite goes away. Probably even 100 or 200 years from now. But, it will be a Ufological Tyrannosaurus Rex: its sell-by date long gone, clinging on to an era also long gone, and perceived by the public of that era as we, today, perceive those nutcases who hold on to centuries-old beliefs that if you sail far enough you’ll fall off the edge of the planet. Or, the deluded souls who think the women on those terrible “Reality TV” shows that sit around arguing over lunch are really arguing.

I agree with some of Nick’s talking points in that UFO conventions often feature speakers who often talk of the “space brothers” and how they will save us and the Earth in spite  of ourselves.

That is just the money making crap and smacks of televangelism.

Paranormal events versus technical reasons for UFOs is the wrong tact however. I think there is a way to join the two, but would be very hard to test using the scientific method.

Maybe there is a way to test paranormal events in the future? I do believe a scientist has tried to do so, but it is proving very hard to confirm by testability.

Perhaps that is why new paradigms are difficult to break through. The old ones must pass away slowly into that sweet night?

The Future of Ufology

The future of ufology. ( The Daily Grail )

UFO Crashes and Psychological Warfare

When UFO crashes became big business in the U.S. Government in 1947 with the formation of the National Security Act ( precursor to the Homeland Security Act post-9/11 in 2001 ) the C.I.A. and other security agencies couldn’t wait to use the stories as cover for Cold War psy-ops.

Here researcher and author Nick Redfern offers up more info on Cold War hanky-panky via the use of UFO crashes, real or imagined:

According to a Technical Report prepared by the Air Force’s flying saucer study, Project Grudge, in August 1949: “Upon eliminating several additional incidents due to vagueness and duplication, there remain 228 incidents, which are considered in this report. Thirty of these could not be explained, because there was found to be insufficient evidence on which to base a conclusion.” Arguably, however, the most important and intriguing entry in the document appears in the Recommendations section. It’s one that many UFO researchers have not appreciated the significance of. It states: “That Psychological Warfare Division and other governmental agencies interested in psychological warfare be informed of the results of this study.”

The Department of Defense’s definition of psychological warfare is: “The planned use of propaganda and other psychological actions having the primary purpose of influencing the opinions, emotions, attitudes, and behavior of hostile foreign groups in such a way as to support the achievement of national objectives.”

Thus, there’s a very good argument to be made that, ever since its earliest years, the UFO phenomenon has been used at an official level as a tool to fool, confuse and alarm the enemy – as well as to confuse the true nature of the UFO phenomenon, too, of course.

I’m on a bit of a crashed UFO kick right now: my previous post here at Mysterious Universe dealt with the way in which the infamous Spitsbergen “Crashed UFO” event of 1952 may have had its origins in a psychological-warfare operation. But, there’s an even earlier one I want to bring to your attention that may fall into precisely this same realm.

Next to the so-called Roswell Incident of July 1947, certainly the most talked-about “UFO crash” of all is that which is alleged to have occurred in the vicinity of Aztec, New Mexico, in 1948. According to information related to the author Frank Scully in the late 1940s (and subsequently published in his best-selling 1950 book, Behind the Flying Saucers), as a result of a number of separate incidents in 1947 and 1948, the wreckage of four alien spacecraft, and no fewer than 34 alien bodies, had been recovered by American authorities, and were being studied under cover of the utmost secrecy at defense establishments in the United States.

As Scully reported, the majority of his data came from two individuals: Silas Mason Newton (described in a 1941 FBI report as a “wholly unethical businessman”) and one “Dr. Gee,” the name given to protect eight scientists, all of whom had supposedly divulged various details of the crashes to Newton and Scully. According to Scully’s sources one such UFO was found in Hart Canyon, near the town of Aztec, in March 1948.

Although the Aztec affair has attracted the attention of numerous UFO researchers over the years, it’s a fascinating piece of documentary evidence relative to the Aztec case that surfaced in the late 1990s I wish to bring to your attention. It came thanks to the late,  investigative author and former CIA employee, Karl Pflock, and it is one that may ultimately shed more important light on the psychological warfare angle of the crashed UFO mystery.

As Pflock stated: “In 1998, under curious circumstances, I was made privy to a fascinating document about one of the most controversial cases of the Golden Age of Flying Saucers, the so-called Aztec crash of 1948. I had little more than passing interest in the case until 1998, when a source, who insists on complete anonymity, showed me a handwritten testament, set down by the key player in this amazing, often amusing, truth-is-stranger-than-fiction episode. The contents of this ‘journal’ seem to lift the veil of mystery and uncertainty from important aspects of the case, while at the same time drawing it more closely around others.”

The story as told to Pflock was that the military was keeping a secret and close watch on Silas Newton when his tales of the Aztec UFO crash were at their height. More remarkably, military personnel were dispatched to visit Newton and told him something amazing: they knew his Aztec story was utterly bogus, but, incredibly, they wanted him to keep telling it!

According to Newton, when writing in his journal about his clandestine Air Force visitors: “They grilled me, tried to poke holes in my story. Had no trouble doing it and laughed in my face about the scientific mistakes I made. They never said so, but I could tell they were trying to find out if I really knew anything about flying saucers that had landed. Did not take those fellows long to decide I did not. But I sure knew they did.”

In view of the revelations that the USAF encouraged Newton to continue championing the Aztec incident (or non-incident!), Karl Pflock wondered: “Did the U.S. Government or someone associated with it use Newton to discredit the idea of crashed flying saucers so a real captured saucer or saucers could be more easily kept under wraps? Was this actually nothing to do with real saucers but instead some sort of psychological warfare operation?”

Within the crashed UFO research arena, researchers are generally polarized into two camps: (A) those who believe aliens really have crashed to Earth; and (B) those that conclude all the cases can be explained in prosaic terms (hoaxes, aircraft crashes and balloon accidents, etc). As both the Aztec affair and the Spitsbergen case demonstrate, however, we might have a better chance of resolving the crashed UFO enigma by digging into the 1947-era-onwards world of military psychological warfare operations than by looking for little men with big black eyes…

It seems more and more lately that Roswell, Aztec and other 1947 – onward UFO “crashes” are being pushed as Cold War psy-ops disinformation.

If that’s the case however, where does that leave the advanced tech that Corso supposedly fed private industry at the time?

Was it alien, or Nazi tech?

The Aztec UFO and Psy-Ops

Hat tip to The Anomalist.

Air Force Personnel and Project SERPO

Caryn Anscomb, a reporter and researcher for Gary Bekkum’s site Starpod.us gives an update on government whistle blowers about the UFO phenomenon, mainly former Air Force personnel.

I used to believe in the SERPO project happening at one time, but I don’t think it fits into the future human coming back to visit us criteria. Now I’m not sure about that theory either since it just muddies up the waters of truth also. But I think one is just as confusing as the other and it doesn’t advance the truth either.

Maybe it wasn’t meant to.

[…]In 1997 Col. Philip Corso’s book “The Day After Roswell” was published. This was the first time that a high ranking and respected military personage had come forward with information in connection to Roswell and crashed disks. Not only that, but Col. Corso states that he witnessed the shipment of dead aliens and was later to personally handle alien artifacts. This book caused a commotion throughout the UFO community, many viewing it as a major revelation and the beginning of a disclosure process they had long awaited.

The late Col. Philip J. Corso’s military history is certainly impressive. During his twenty-one-year military career, he was honored with nineteen medals, decorations and ribbons for meritorious service. He was a key Army intelligence officer who served on General MacArthur’s staff in Korea.

From 1953 to 1956, Corso was given intelligence staff assignments on both the Psychological Strategy Board (PSB) and the Operations Coordinating Board (OCB). The OCB was established as an independent agency by Executive Order 10483, September 2, 1953, to report to the NSC (National Security Council) on the development, by appropriate Executive branch agencies, of operational plans for national security policies of international import. In 1961, Corso was assigned to Research and Development (R&D) at the Pentagon, working under Lt. General Arthur Trudeau, head of Army R&D.

Col. Corso retired from the army in 1963, and went on to serve Senator James Eastland and Strom Thurmond as a staff member specializing in national security.

In 1947, Corso was posted to Fort Riley, Kansas. On the afternoon of July 6th 1947, several army vehicles pulled in to Fort Riley with a shipment of cargo on route to Wright Field, Ohio. (Wright Field became Wright-Patterson AFB in 1948). The crates were offloaded and stored in one of the old veterinary buildings on the base. That evening Corso was assigned to post duty and whilst doing his security checks he made his way over to the veterinary buildings to check on Bill Brown, who was on post duty that night.

According to Corso, when he got there he noticed Brown wasn’t stationed at his post, as he stood wondering where Brown could be he heard a voice hiss out of the darkness “Major Corso”.

It was Brown, he sounded excited and told Corso that he should take a look at the crates stored in the building. Corso, after much debate with Brown agrees to take a look. One of the crates had already been opened so the lid didn’t prove too troublesome to remove. As he peered into the crate the shock of what he discovered sent him into a swoon. Instead of weapons, as expected, he could make out a small-framed body suspended in an unusual thick blue liquid.

“At first I thought it was a dead child they were shipping somewhere,” writes Corso, “But this was no child. It was a four-foot human-shaped figure with arms, bizarre-looking six-fingerer hands –- I didn’t see a thumb —  thin legs and feet, and an oversized incandescent light bulb-shaped head that looked like it was floating over a balloon gondola for a chin.” [1] Corso adds that the image of the dead alien never left his memory.

In 1961, Corso was assigned to Research and Development (R&D) at the Pentagon, working under Lt. General Arthur Trudeau. Corso was in the Trudeau’s office when Trudeau pointed to a filing cabinet and said, “This has some special files, war materiel you’ve never seen before, that I want to put under your Foreign Technology responsibilities.” [2] The General informed Corso that the filing cabinet would be transferred to Corso’s office and that Corso was to decide how to deal with the contents advising Corso that he should do a little research on the Roswell files first.

According to Corso, the cabinet contained retrieved alien artifacts from the Roswell crash and he had been placed in charge of devising a way to exploit the obvious strategic value of the wreckage. The wreckage had evidently been locked away in the Army’s possession from 1947 to 1961, with very few knowing about it. The few who did know were convinced that certain U.S. intelligence agencies had been infiltrated by Soviet spies and informers, and the UFO wreckage was so sensitive that no one could be trusted to deal with it. So Corso’s task from 1961 to 1963, was to secretly distribute various pieces of potentially valuable wreckage to scientists and industrial bodies who were known to be trustworthy, and the human patent process would effectively mask the alien source of the technology.

In January, 1994, author and researcher Karl T. Pflock met up with Col. Corso at the International UFO Museum in Roswell, New Mexico. Corso had returned to New Mexico to refresh his memories before starting work on his memoirs. Corso had arrived at the museum before Pflock, and had a private meeting with Glenn Dennis and two others whilst waiting. Corso discussed his involvement in a project that had been set up to learn the secrets of the Roswell saucer and put them to use in national defense, and allegedly showed Dennis and the others sketches of aliens.

On Pflock’s arrival the party left the museum and made their way to the alleged UFO crash sites, and debris field. On route Corso told Pflock about his interest in Roswell and said that he had played a small role in the aftermath of the affair, and that he would be including it as a minor piece in his memoirs. Pflock states that it struck him that Corso really knew very little about the Roswell incident and appeared to be trying to gather information from others in the group. Corso goes on to make some outlandish claims about an encounter he’d had with a CIA operative and how he had to read him the riot act, and had to even get a little physically aggressive with him.

Unbeknown to Corso, Pflock knew the CIA station chief who Corso was referring to, from his time in the agency. Pflock knew the story was highly unlikely and wrote Corso off as another blowhard.

In 1997, Pflock was asked to review a new book publication, it happened to be “The Day After Roswell” by Col. Philip Corso. Pflock was astonished to find that instead of the expected memoirs a significant amount of information in the book pertained to Corso’s personal involvement with a dead ET and retrieved alien artifacts. Much to Pflock’s surprise, Senator Strom Thurmond had written a brief foreword for Corso’s book. Pflock called the senator’s press secretary and discovered that Corso had asked the senator to write a foreword to his memoirs “I Walked with Giants: My Career in Military Intelligence.” According to the senator’s press secretary no mention of a book on Roswell and USG cover-ups had been mentioned.

On June 5th, 1997, in a press release on the matter, Senator Thurmond states:

I did not, and would not, pen the foreword to a book about, or containing, a suggestion that the success of the United States in the Cold War is attributable to the technology found on a crashed UFO. I do not believe in UFOs, do not believe that the United States is in possession of such a vehicle, and do not believe that there has been any government cover-up of a UFO crash. The outline of I Walk [ed] with Giants provided to me by Mr. Corso indicated he was writing a book of his recollections and observations on topics such as World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnamese Conflict, intelligence, espionage, and counter-espionage operations. There was absolutely no mention, suggestion, or indication that any of the chapters and subjects listed dealt with Unidentified Flying Objects and government conspiracies to cover-up the existence of such a space vehicle.

Senator Thurmond’s foreword was promptly removed from subsequent printings of the book.

I have checked Corso’s DA record, and it does show that Corso was in the places he says he was. However, without substantive evidence to back his claims up, and there is very little at this time, the fact that he was in the right locations and at the right times does not validate his claims.

In June, 1998, one month before his death, Corso filed an affidavit in the U. S. District Court for the District of Arizona — via Citizens Against UFO Secrecy v. Department of the Army (Civil Action No. 98-0538 PHX ROS).

Corso states:

I, [Lt.] Col. Philip J. Corso, do hereby swear, under the penalties of perjury, that the following statements are true:

That at all times hereinafter mentioned, I was a member and officer of the defendant.

That during my tenure with the defendant I was a member of President Eisenhower’s National Security Council and former head of the Foreign Technology Desk at defendant’s Research & Development department.

That on or about July 6, 1947, while stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas, I personally observed a four-foot non-human creature with bizarre-looking four-fingered hands, thin legs and feet, and an oversized incandescent-light-bulb-shaped head. The eye sockets were oversized and almond-shaped and pointed down to its tiny nose. The creature’s skull was overgrown to the point where all its facial features were arranged frontally, occupying only a small circle on the lower part of the head. There were no eyebrows or any indications of facial hair. The creature had only a tiny flat slit for a mouth and it was completely closed, resembling more of a crease or indentation between the nose and the bottom of the chinless skull than a fully functioning orifice.

That in 1961, I came into possession of what I refer to as the ‘Roswell File.’ This file contained field reports, medical autopsy reports and technological debris from the crash [of] an extraterrestrial vehicle in Roswell, New Mexico in 1947.

That I have personally read the medical autopsy reports which refer to the autopsy of the previously described creature that I saw in 1947 at Fort Riley, Kansas.

That said autopsy reports indicated the autopsy was performed at Walter Reed [Army] Hospital, which was under the authority of the defendant at the time of the autopsy.

That said autopsy report referred to the creature as an ‘extraterrestrial biological entity’ …

The question remains: was Corso telling the truth, was he over-inflating his involvement and position, as some have claimed, or could he have been engaged in a little ongoing intelligence work, a final bit for government and country?

We might never know.

Corso, like so many UFO proponents, claims Government cover-ups of the reality of UFOs and nefarious acts perpetrated by the CIA to shut the public up and put researchers off the scent should they get too close to the truth. Shadowy cabals and secret Majestic types, all hell bent on keeping the public in the dark for their own wicked ends.

One such group often referred to in the UFO world are the AVIARY, an alleged group of high-level insiders, with CIA/military/government connections. They all have bird names (hence the AVIARY) and according to many UFOlogists, when they’re not trying to fry your minds with psychotronic weapons, they are out to hide ET secrets through deception and skullduggery. In fact, although the existence of MJ-12 is highly questionable, the AVIARY does ‘loosely’ exist and part of the above is factual. The majority do have CIA/military/government connections. But rather than a tight-knit secret cabal, they are a loose network of professionals who share a mutual interest in UFOs and parapsychology. Some are good friends and some have worked together on a variety projects researching UFO data and the paranormal.

The bird name code was the brainchild of William Moore. He and his colleague, Jaime Shandera, needed a safe means for discussing some of their more sensitive contacts when in public or over the phone. So partially tongue and cheek they settled for bird names. Virtually everyone they came in contact with, who had some form of government connection, were allocated a bird name. Many of the birds were unaware of their code names until months, if not years later. The core group of the AVIARY are fairly well known in UFO circles. These ‘core’ members formed the UFO Working Group, a couple having worked together on psi research and remote viewing projects, and later at NIDS (National Institute of Discovery Science).

Out of all the bird names the ‘Falcon’ is possibly the most mysterious, having not been clearly identified to date.

[Editor’s note: In July 2012, author Greg Bishop revealed that Bill Moore identified FALCON to him as the late Harry Rositzke.]( Emphasis mine )

Several names have been put forward over the years as possible candidates for ‘Falcon,’ including:

  • Richard C. Dotty, USAF
  • Richard Helms (deceased), former DCI at CIA
  • Dale Graff, physicist and former director of Project STAR GATE, and Founder of The Baycliff International Psi/RV Alert Center
  • Col. Barry Hennessy, Director of Security, Counterintelligence and Special Program Oversight, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • Cecil B. Scott Jones, PhD, former officer with the Office of Naval Intelligence.

In order to collate the opening comments to this series of articles, we need to hone in on a few key individuals, whose respective legs straddle the UFO / parapsychological realms. The first notable character is Dr. C. B. Scott Jones, who embodies this overlap between UFO culture, parapsychology and Intel. He is a former officer with the Office of Naval Intelligence (retiring as Commander in the US Navy) he participated in a number contracts with the DIA over the years and from 1985 to 1991, Scott Jones was appointed as Special Assistant to Senator Claiborne Pell.

In 1985, he founded and was president of the Center for Applied Anomalous Phenomena, a non-profit educational and scientific research organization which was chartered to conduct research and analysis of anomalous phenomena. Networking with the para-psychological and UFO communities, he has worked throughout the executive branch to address issues of government support for basic parapsychological research, and to consider implications and application of these phenomena.

In 1989, Dr Jones and Senator Claiborne Pell co-founded the Human Potential Foundation. The Foundation was involved in a number of research projects, including a joint research effort with the Chinese Academy of Somatic Science in Beijing, in accelerated bone healing using Qi Gong; a sponsored symposium conducted by Russian medical scientists on psychoanalytical and psycho-correction computer technologies and the translation from Chinese of the book Collected Works on Qi Gong Science.

The late Philip Corso was also a proponent of the aliens are time travelers theory and I have a hard time thinking he had knoweledge of SERPO.

But necessity makes strange bedfellows at times, whether purposely or not.

Paranoia, Suspicion and Allegations Abound … Caryn Anscomb’s UFO Trickster

The U.K. and their released UFO Files

Last week the U.K. Ministry of Defence released more of their UFO files. Some of them have discussions made by various Parliment ministers and they reveal some very interesting tales:

Ukufo

Newly released X-Files from the United Kingdom’s National Archives reveal the role of that country’s Ministry of Defense UFO Desk officers, what they actually thought about possible alien visits to Earth and their ideas on harnessing alien technology as a weapon.

There are 25 files, comprising more than 6,700 pages, that include UFO policy, parliamentary questions, media issues, public correspondence and, of course, UFO sighting reports. Overall, more than 10,000 UFO reports came through the special Ministry of Defense unit from 1950 to 2009.

“These are probably the most fascinating and bizarre government files ever made available to the public,” said Nick Pope, who was the UFO Desk officer from 1991 to 1994.

“There’s massive public interest in UFOs, and at one point, the MoD was getting more Freedom of Information Act requests about UFOs than any other subject,” Pope told The Huffington Post in an email. “The files contain the usual mixture of policy documents, sighting reports, photos, sketches and papers discussing how best to handle the subject with Parliament, the media and the public.”

File DEFE 24/2080/1 is a collection of MoD UFO information from 1972 to 1995 that includes intelligence papers that were declassified from “secret.”

On page 157 of this file is a briefing prepared for the MoD before a 1979 House of Lords debate in which an intelligence officer asks why aliens would want to visit “an insignificant planet (the Earth) of an uninteresting star (the sun).” He wrote that this sort of visit “would probably not occur more than once in 1,000 years or so, even if one assumes that every intelligent community made 10 launches a year.” The officer concluded that “claims of thousands of visits in the last decade or so are far too large to be credible.”

Pages 38 to 43 of the file contain a 1995 briefing by a UFO Desk officer, calling for a full study of UFOs, since national security implications had never been assessed. The writer suggested that, “If the sightings are not of this Earth, then their purpose needs to be established as a matter of priority.”

In that same briefing, an intelligence officer indicates the need to capture UFO technology for U.K. use. “If the reports are taken at face value, then devices exist that do not use conventional reaction propulsion systems; they have a very wide range of speeds and are stealthy. I suggest we could use this technology, if it exists.”

File DEFE 24/2090/1 references a U.K. study of what were called Unexplained Aerial Phenomena, or UAP. Page 47 of this file reports that some UFOs/UAP might be rare atmospheric plasmas or ball lightning that could be harnessed or used by the military as “novel weapon technology.”

A recent Huffington Post story included statements from former undercover CIA officer Chase Brandon, who said that in the 1990s, he found a box labeled “Roswell” at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. Brandon said there was information in that box that was related to the alleged 1947 UFO crash outside of Roswell, N.M.

File DEFE 24/1985/1 brings up the subject of the Roswell incident in a Jan. 3, 1997, response to a question raised on whether or not the MoD had ever been briefed by the CIA about Roswell. The response by a Defense Intelligence official states, “We have no data on the alleged ‘Roswell incident’ or any ‘crashed UFO incidents in the UK.’ In short, DI 55 has no records of any UAP/UFO ‘crashes’ in either the UK or US and have never, as far as we can tell from existing files, received any briefs from any US agencies, including the CIA.”

“The question of whether or not we’re alone in the universe is one of the biggest and most profound questions we can ask,” said Pope. “People are fascinated with the idea that we might have been visited, and these files chart MoD’s attempts to grapple with the subject.”

There is much more to be revealed about the U.K. files, including how Prime Minister Tony Blair was briefed on UFO sightings in 1998, and how the efforts of David Clarke of Sheffield Hallam University were instrumental in getting the MoD to release the UFO files to the public.

While the British are releasing their files ( even though the info isn’t really “new” ) the good ol’ U.S. maintains their policy of deny and debunk.

And guess who probably has control of any back-engineered technology, if there was any to be had?

UFO X-Files Released By U.K. Reveal Desire To Weaponize Alien Technology

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