Daily Archives: August 28th, 2009

Could Q-life be UFOs?

UFOs by far are some of the most unexplained mysteries of the 21st Century. Nobody has any hard physical evidence of their existence (but trace evidence at certain sites do) and of course eye-witness accounts still come in.

This week I posted an article from Kevin Randle on how the ‘old geezers’ of UFO study has solved the problem long ago. And I posted some articles against that argument, but not too much. I really wanted to get more responses from other readers about the ETH (nuts and bolts theory/extraterrestrial hypothesis). And I wasn’t disappointed by the answers I got. One of the most prevalent answers I got was about the ‘cryptoterrestrial’ or an earlier life form that evolved intelligence and went through an intellectual ‘singularity’ before humans have ever evolved intelligence.

Thus during the centuries of our existence, these beings have always observed us, occasionally interacting with us at a level that early humans, and even today some would call supernaturally.

And that is the cusp point we are with UFO studies now; the ‘nuts and bolts’ folks and the folks who theorize the phenomenon is more along the lines of the paranormal, the realm of ghosts, spirits, demons, angelic beings or telekenetic formations.

My thoughts lean more toward the nuts and bolts side, simply because at some sites physical trace evidence such as burns, chemical changes and metallic flaking/powders has been collected by MUFON researchers. At paranormal visitations/sites there is usually no trace evidence left at all, other than questionable photographic evidence.

So to me, Clarke’s Third Law still holds up.

That doesn’t mean UFOs are alien in nature, it just means whomever, or whatever is doing this stuff, their tech is like magic to us.

So which brings me to this; what kind of life would possess this magic/tech?

Well, according to Peter Fotis Kapnistos, “Q-life” :

The introduction of modern science finally consigned ghosts and spirits to the fantasy zone of delusions and superstitions. In our day, eminent reasoned thinkers are in charge of our scientific and educational systems. But the swift growth of astrobiology in the past few years has presented an exceptional challenge. Several popular theories have been proposed about the possible basis of alien life. The latest phase in the critical analysis of extraterrestrial life now focuses on what physicist and astrobiologist Paul Davies recently described as “Q-life.”

“A century and a half after Charles Darwin published On The Origin of Species, the origin of life itself remains a stubborn mystery, and is deeply problematic. The simplest known living organism is already stupendously complex, and it is inconceivable that such an entity would arise spontaneously by chance self-assembly. Most researchers suppose that life began either with a set of self-replicating, digital-information-carrying molecules much simpler than DNA, or with a self-catalyzing chemical cycle that stored no precise genetic information but was capable of producing additional quantities of the same chemical mixture. Both these approaches focus on the reproduction of material substances, which is only natural because, after all, known life reproduces by copying genetic material. However, the key properties of life — replication with variation, and natural selection — do not logically require material structures themselves to be replicated. It is sufficient that information is replicated. This opens up the possibility that life may have started with some form of quantum replicator: Q-life, if you like.”

Q-life –– set apart as a “life form without material structure” –– ironically harks back to our ancient belief in spirits. According to Professor Davies, the benefit of simply copying information at the quantum level, instead of building rigid duplicate molecular structures, is speed: “Q-life can therefore evolve many orders of magnitude faster than chemical life,” Davies pointed out. The environment of theoretical Q-life is unclear, but the surfaces of interstellar grains or the interiors of comets could allow “low-temperature environments with rich physical and chemical potential.”

The possibility of a quantum replicator became evident in 2007, when an international panel from the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Max Planck Institute of Germany, and the University of Sydney found that under certain conditions galactic dust “comes alive” in outer space. The panel’s chief researcher, V.N. Tsytovich, announced that microscopic corkscrew shapes (helixes and double helixes) could form “spontaneously” in interstellar space. As they have memory and the power to reproduce, the helical strands show the necessary properties to meet the criteria for life. Since that affirmative disclosure, NASA scientists have given weight to a search for what they now call “weird life” –– organisms that lack DNA or other molecules found in life on Earth.

I have read some articles on Physorg during the year about dusts and plasma in the Universe that take on ‘life-like’ qualities, but it’s hard for me to understand their jargon.

So like most people, I tune it out.

But maybe, just maybe, there just might be K-type 3 or 4 civilizations that are dust formations around black holes, contemplating great thoughts.

Or post-singularity Kurzweillian civilizations?

Wouldn’t they be considered ‘supernatural’ by our reckoning?

The “spirit or alien” Question