Category Archives: symbolism

Projects Beta and Bluebeam: National Security State Disinfo Dujour!

When it comes to investigating the National Security State and disinformation about UFOs, nobody does it better than Nick Redfern.

However in this recent entry at Mysterious Universe, he posts a commentary on Greg Bishop‘s book Project Beta: The Story of Paul Bennewitz, National Security, and the Creation of a Modern UFO Myth.

In the book Bishop writes about the very real sad story about physicist Paul Bennewitz and the way the government apparatus of the security state used and abused this man to drive away his sanity, thusly to stoke the mythology of UFOs into the American psyche:

Many people unacquainted with the complexities of the UFO puzzle assume that all talk of attempts by “the government” to silence certain players in the field is nothing but outright paranoia and lies. Even within Ufology there are those who dismiss such stories as X-Files-like nonsense. How wrong they all are. Published in 2005, Greg Bishop’s book, Project Beta: The Story of Paul Bennewitz, National Security, and the Creation of a Modern UFO Myth, provided the field of UFO research with what was without doubt one if its most important contributions in years.

The subject matter of Project Beta was an unusual one; and while seasoned researchers were already aware of certain aspects of this dark and ultimately tragic affair, those unaccustomed to the events in question might have been forgiven for thinking that they had stumbled upon a high-tech, X-Files-meets-Robert Ludlum-style thriller. But Project Beta told a very real story – one that was as harrowing as it was informative.

In essence, the truth-is-stranger-than-fiction book related the saga of physicist Paul Bennewitz, who, after digging into Air Force and National Security Agency secret projects at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico in the late 1970s that he believed were connected to the activities of sinister extraterrestrials and UFOs, was put under deep surveillance by the US military and intelligence services, and was bombarded by the murky world of officialdom with a mass of disinformation, faked stories and outright lies in order to divert him from his research – which worked. In fact, it worked rather too well, and led to the mental and psychological disintegration of Bennewitz.

While everyone with an interest in UFOs should read Greg Bishop’s book, it will not please all – particularly those who are of the opinion that aliens inhabit underground bases in the United States, that cattle mutilations are the work of sinister extraterrestrials, or that the rumors of government-alien collusion have a firm basis in reality. As Greg skillfully demonstrated, many of the cornerstones upon which today’s ufological lore are built, had their origins in the fertile minds of military intelligence and the behind-the-scenes, spook-brigade.

Much of the UFO “truth” fed to the research community by purported and sympathetic insiders and whistleblowers might not be “out there” after all. It may all be one big con behind which a veritable plethora of classified, military projects have been hidden – and, in the Bennewitz caper, projects specifically focused upon NSA communications systems, test flights (and possibly crashes) of early, prototype Stealth aircraft, and Air Force technologies designed to track the orbital movements of space satellites launched by the former Soviet Union.

As Project Beta skillfully revealed, Bennewitz had come to the conclusion that the collective operations described above were related to the activities of extraterrestrials, when in reality the truth was far more down to earth, although most certainly not in a mundane fashion. The book demonstrated that the Intelligence community cared not a bit that Bennewitz thought that their secret operations were UFO-related – precisely because the UFO connection was one of Bennewitz’s own making.

However, there was deep concern on the part of the world of officialdom that by digging into classified activities at Kirtland in search of UFOs, Bennewitz would inadvertently reveal – to the Soviets, in a worst-case scenario – information and technology that had to be kept secret at all costs, even if those costs included Bennewitz’s own sanity.

And so a plan was initiated: Having learned the essential parts of Bennewitz’s theories – very ironically from the man himself, by actually breaking into his home while he was out and checking his files and research notes – that aliens were mutilating cattle as part of some weird medical experiment; that they were abducting American citizens and implanting them with devices for purposes unknown; that those same aliens were living deep underground in a secure fortress at Dulce, New Mexico; and that we were all very soon going to be in deep and dire trouble as a direct result of the presence of this brewing, intergalactic threat, the Air Force gave Bennewitz precisely what he was looking for – confirmation that his theories were all true, and more.

Of course, this was all just a carefully-planned ruse to bombard Bennewitz with so much faked UFO data in the hope that it would steer him away from the classified military projects of a non-UFO nature that he had uncovered. And, indeed, it worked.

When Bennewitz received conformation (albeit carefully controlled and utterly fabricated confirmation) that, yes, he had stumbled upon the horrible truth and that, yes, there really was an alien base deep below Dulce, the actions of the Intelligence community had the desired effect: Bennewitz became increasingly paranoid and unstable, and he began looking away from Kirtland (the hub of the secrets that had to be kept) and harmlessly towards the vicinity of Dulce, where his actions, research, and theories could be carefully controlled and manipulated by the Government.

As long-time watchers of the ufological research scene will be aware, American Intelligence even brought Bill Moore (co-author with Charles Berlitz of the 1980 book, The Roswell Incident) into the scheme and asked him to keep them informed of how their disinformation operations against Bennewitz were working. In return, Moore was promised – and provided with – data and documents on super-secret, official UFO projects, crashed saucers, dead aliens, and more.

Bishop and Redfern aren’t the only folks to write extensively about the connection between UFOs and government disinformation. Chris Knowles over at the Secret Sun posted about another plan that was fed to another unfortunate individual, Serge Monast, which was none other than a script written by Gene Roddenberry in the 1970s for a future episode of Star Trek — in case it got revived!:

Anyone who spends anytime looking into the UFO phenomena has probably seen the words “Project Blue Beam” – often misspelled – show up when any aerial anomalies are being discussed online.
“Blue Beam” has become such a catch-all that it’s now applied to any sighting, no matter how trivial. It’s also been stretched to explain phenomena that have nothing to do with UFOs at all. You often see it conflated with HAARP, a very real program that’s also been stretched to explain anything that might otherwise require actual thought to deal with.
We saw any number of claims that the balloon show on October 13 was itself the work of this mythical Blue Beam, even though the event itself has little to do with the claims of the original “Project Blue Beam” essay, which was published online by the radical Fundamentalist and Quebec separatist Serge Monast. “Blue Beam” has been dated to 1994, but I don’t remember hearing anything about it until at least 1996, when Monast died of an apparent heart attack. But 1994 is very, very important to the chain of events we’re going to look at in this piece.
UFOs and the National Security State author Richard Dolan got so sick of hearing about the mythical Project Blue Beam that he wrote a scathing essay entitled “Project Blue Beam Countdown? Don’t Bet on It”in the run-up to an alleged Blue Beam event on October 13. In it, Dolan outlined the claims made in Monast’s original essay:

First, a series of artificially created earthquakes at “certain precise locations on the planet,” which will uncover archaeological evidence that will “be used to discredit all fundamental religious doctrines.”
Second, we will be subjected to “a gigantic space show.” This will involve “three-dimensional optical holograms and sounds, laser projection of multiple holographic images to different parts of the world, each receiving a different image according to predominating regional national religious faith. This new ‘god’s’ voice will be speaking in all languages.” These staged events will show the “new Christ” or Messiah, and will be a false Second Coming.
Third will be the “Telepathic Electronic Two-Way.” This involves “telepathic and electronically augmented two-way communication where ELF, VLF and LF waves will reach each person from within his or her own mind.” These communications will fake a communication from god.
Fourth, according to Monast, would be “the universal supernatural manifestation with electronic means.” He said it would take on three specific “orientations.” One would simulate an alien invasion, which would then provoke nations with nuclear weapons to strike back.

Dolan quoted extensively from Monast’s writings so that reasonable individuals could get a measure of the man and the extremist religious views that dictated his view of world events:

I included this long passage just so that you could get a whiff of the mind of this man. Very intense, no understanding of science. At no point in any of Monast’s writings is anything like evidence offered for any of this. To say nothing of the fantastic capabilities he attributes to NASA or the United Nations.

The logistics of the various sky shows also seems daunting, to say the least. First there is the false alien invasion scenario — presumably this could be done with a fleet of black triangles, although could they blanket the world? Doubtful. But then, regarding the religious fakery, are “they” really going to blanket the world with holographic images of, what — God? Jesus? Krishna? Allah? All the while sending a message into our brains via extra low frequencies in all languages of the world? All in a way that convinces us to abandon our previously held faiths?

What Dolan may not have realized it is that Monast – rather, the mischeivous spooks who fed him the whole Blue Beam scenario in the first place – was/were borrowing plots points left, right and center from another source.
We’ll get to that in a moment, but first Dolan took the time to dismiss most of the current Blue Beam theorizing as regurgitated bullshit:

None of these sites offer anything resembling evidence to support the alleged existence of Blue Beam. I am not asking for proof, only evidence. And I see nothing.

Well, there is evidence of Blue Beam, only it comes from a source one would never confuse with Jane’s Defence Weekly or Covert Action Quarterly. For some deep background on all of this alleged devilry, let’s travel back to 1994.
RECYCLED STAR TREK SCRIPTS
Not long before Serge Monast stunned the conspiracy circuit with his “Project Blue Beam,” a book was released on Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry. It recounted information that hardcore Trekkers were well familiar with; Roddenberry’s proposed Star Trek feature film script from the mid-70s:

“In May 1975, Gene Roddenberry accepted an offer from Paramount to develop Star Trek into a feature film, and moved back into his old office on the Paramount lot. His proposed story told of a flying saucer, hovering above Earth, that was programmed to send down people who looked like prophets, including Jesus Christ.
Gene Roddenberry: The Myth and the Man Behind Star Trek by Joel Engel, p.165, Hyperion, 1994

Shortly thereafter, Monast writes of a very similar situation- a satellite that will project images of holy figures:

With computer animation and sounds appearing to emanate from the very depths of space, astonished ardent followers of the various creeds will witness their own returned messiahs in convincing lifelike reality.
Then the projections of Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, Krishna, etc., will merge into one after correct explanations of the mysteries and revelations will have been disclosed.

So, already we see two of Monast’s Blue Beam claims – an alien “invasion” and a false reappearance of the Earth’s major historical prophets – taken straight out of the Star Trek script.
How are these images of these gods to be received? In both cases, telepathically.

Monast again, 1994: The advancement of techniques propel us toward the third step in the Blue Beam Project that goes along with the telepathic and electronically augmented two-way communication where ELF, VLF and LF waves will reach each person from within his or her own mind, convincing each of them that their own god is speaking to them from the very depths of their own soul.

Roddenberry, 1976: “On the planet below, people are beginning to receive mental impressions of a returning God.”

The projected images are only part of Blue Beam; there’s also the “massive UFO invasion.” Note: Monast’s “UFO over every major city” scenario is stolen from the original V (1983), which in turn was borrowed from Roddenberry’s original 70s script for Earth: Final Conflict.:

Monast, 1994: “The first is the ‘space show.’ Where does the space show come from? The space show, the holographic images will be used in a simulation of the ending during which all nations will be shown scenes that will be the fulfillment of that which they desire to verify the prophecies and adversary events.
“One is to make mankind believe that an alien (off-world) invasion is about to occur at every major city on earth in order to provoke each major nation to use its nuclear weapons in order to strike back.”
Roddenberry, 1976: “At the same time a huge object, one thousand times larger than a starship, is moving toward Earth, knocking off the U.S.S. Potemkin and hurtling a cluster of asteroids toward Earth. Kirk, now a grounded admiral, assembles his old crew (all of whom have risen higher in rank), and they take the newly refitted Enterprise on a mission of interception with the alien claiming to be God.”

The whole point of all of this is to convince the world that these computers on these orbital platforms are the work of God, but it’s all a grand deception. In both cases:

Monast, 1994: The result of these deliberately staged events will be to show the world the new ‘christ,’ the new messiah, Matraia (Maitreya), for the immediate implementation of the new world religion. Enough truth will be foisted upon an unsuspecting world to hook them into the lie. “Even the most learned will be deceived.”
Roddenberry, 1976: “The Object turns out to be more than just a vessel–it is a computer form so advanced it is a living entity itself. However, we discover that this God they’ve worshipped is actually the Deceiver, the computer-programmed remains of a race who were “cast out” from their dimension and into this one.”
Roddenberry quotes taken from The Making of Star Trek-The Motion Picture, by Susan Sackett and Gene Roddenberry, Pocket/Wallaby, 1980

So again, Monast’s Blue Beam is essentially the same as Roddenberry’s “God Thing.” Both are computer programs on orbital platforms creating electronic visions and apparitions, tailor-made to the beliefs of certain populations. The difference is that Monast chalks it all up to NASA while Roddenberry was describing a malfunctioning alien craft:

Monast, 1994: “Computers will coordinate the satellites and software already in place will run the sky show. Holographic images are based on nearly identical signals combining to produce an image or hologram with deep perspective which is equally applicable to acoustic ELF, VLF and LF waves and optical phenomena.” Roddenberry: “Somewhere out there,” [Gene] starts off, his eyes widening as he continues, “there’s this massive … entity, this abstract, unknown life force that seems mechanical in nature, although it actually possesses its own highly advanced consciousness. It’s a force thousands of times greater than anything intergalactic civilization has ever witnessed. It could be God, it could be Satan, and it’s heading toward earth. It demands worship and assistance, and it’s also in a highly volatile state of disrepair.”
Star Trek Movie Memories by William Shatner with Chris Kreski, HarperCollins, 1994 (note publication date)

Themes from Roddenberry’s unused script were recycled throughout the franchise’s history, including the ST: TNG episode “Justice” and the now-notorious Star Trek V: The Final Frontier. Then there was the Next Generation episode, “Devil’s Due,” which was one of the highest rated episode’s in the series history.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Izwxbmwo9qw&feature=player_embedded
This episode, which ran in 1991, had even stronger echoes of Monast’s 1994 “Blue Beam” theories. Here’s the synopsis:

The USS Enterprise-D responds to a distress signal from a science station on Ventax II, where the planet is in chaos over the return of a being who claims to be that culture’s “devil.”

Not coincidentally, that devil is there to install a new world order on the alien planet. Which brings us to Monast’s “Blue Beam” denouement:

The second is to make the Christians believe that the Rapture is going to occur with the supposed divine intervention of an alien (off-world) civilization coming to rescue earthlings from a savage and merciless demon. Its goal will be to dispose of all significant opposition to the implementation of the New World Order in one major stroke, actually within hours of the beginning of the sky show!

Again, this is the same scenario we see before in “Devil’s Due,” which is based in themes Roddenberry first explored in his God Thing script. The parallels continue: Monast writes in Blue Beam that “the first step in the NASA Blue Beam Project concerns the breakdown [re-evaluation] of all archaeological knowledge. It deals with the set-up, with artificially created earthquakes at certain precise locations on the planet.”

I must also note that investigator Richard Dolan has written about the national security state and disinformation. Despite of this evidence, folks such as Stephen Bassett and Dr. Steven Greer spread the religious mythology of “good aliens” into the memestream.

Stay tuned for more fun!

Update: I find it interesting that Wikipedia doesn’t have an entry on Stephen Bassett. Anyone have a “theory” on this parculiarity?

NASA Gets Sirius on the 17th (UPDATE)

Project Blue Beam Exposed! (UPDATED)

UFOs: The Project Beta Scandal

Special hat tips to The Anomalist and the Daily Grail.

Those evil, soul harvesting ETs

As a kind of continuation of my previous post (Dolan on Malstrom), the possible interference of UFOs/inhabitants in the US nuclear missile force is a meme that is gaining traction in our culture and ties in with another meme that is also getting attention; the idea that UFO beings are demonic in nature and that nothing good can come of them.

First, in the past few years serious researchers are considering the fact that UFOs have qualities that mimic paranormal, or ghostly ones. That ability to flicker in and out of sight, turn at right angles, shape shift and become a ‘personal’ experience for the observer. This is not an old idea. Investigator John Keel wrote about this during the 1960s. Researcher Jacques Vallee followed in suit in the 1970s. And Vallee was a staunch ETH nuts and bolts guy at first!

So the demonic meme isn’t an old one, just one that has had a resurgence. The most notable example is Nick Redfern’s ‘Final Events, and the Secret Government Group on Demonic UFOs and the Afterlife ‘ , a tome that is an expose of a secret think tank in the American espionage organization CIA and its plan to make the USA in a fascistic theocracy in order to save American ‘souls’ so they won’t get ‘harvested’ by these demonic beings.

What is curious about this meme is the Judeo-Christian flavor of it and to me, that is suspicious. For it completely leaves out the pantheon of gods and demons of the other religions on the earth.

There’s no mention of djinns, manitus, vimanas or anything like that in this think tank’s study, it’s completely fundamentalist, evangelical Christian in scope.

Writer and researcher Micah Hanks of The Gralien Report and Magic, Mysticism and the Molecule weighs in on this subject of demonic UFOs most eloquently and assuredly better than I can:

Quoting Archbishop Desmond Tutu in this week’s edition of Time Magazine, apartheid’s fierce adversary and soon-to-be-retiring holy man commented that, “The texture of our universe is one where there is no question at all but that good and laughter and justice will prevail.” Considering this philosophy alongside popular speculation that alien species may have been visiting Earth for hundreds, if not thousands of years, one might surmise that their intentions were good, also. If aliens are actually here, they haven’t harmed us yet, right?Speculation of this sort no doubt raises contention within ufological circles. After all, there appear to be two differing viewpoints present in modern ufology which, over the years, have slowly resulted in a sort of loose segregation among its ranks: those who believe aliens are here to help humankind, and those who feel that their intentions are more dubious, and present cause for concern. Though these differing perspectives will no doubt continue to foster argument, it is interesting to consider how people’s beliefs in this regard are affected by theology, namely that of Judeo-Christian origin.

During a recent interview, UFO researcher and Presbyterian minister Barry Downing told AOL News that UFOs “may have been around for millions of years,” and speculates that their presence could have had some influence on the “development of the biblical religion.” Downing’s 1968 book The Bible and Flying Saucers sought to draw connections between biblical mythology and visits from alien beings, similar to those proposed by the various progenitors of the “ancient astronaut” hypothesis, namely Ezekiel reporting the appearance of flying “wheels” in the Old Testament (Ezekiel 1:16). Downing cites the parting of the Red Sea that granted safe passage to the Israelites–and even the Ascension of Jesus Christ–as other instances where ancient people sought to explain complex phenomenon where aliens might have intervened.

Since the instances related above are generally accepted as miracles or, at very least, circumstances that seemed to work in favor of Judeo-Christians people in the Old and New Testament, one obvious perspective would liken the resulting influence of presumed alien visitors to that of angelic beings. This notion is contrasted rather drastically with the assertions made in my colleague Nick Redfern’s new book Final Events, and the Secret Government Group on Demonic UFOs and the Afterlife. Redfern’s book tells the peculiar story of the Collins Elite, an organization with members in various branches of government (namely the CIA) who begun investigating UFOs and their potential link to the devilish dealings of Aleister Crowley and, perhaps more importantly, Jet Propulsion Lab co-founder Jack Parsons. The notion that UFOs and their alien occupants may actually be linked to dark dealings and satanic rites is hardly new (as Redfern’s book illustrates), having been proposed in ufological circles by the likes of Daniel Boudillion, Greg Bishop and myself in my book Magic, Mysticism and the Molecule. But is there any credible link between the presumed activities of extraterrestrials and demonic forces?

Many have proposed the odd theory that alien abductions are actually representative of a tangible process of removing people’s souls, which our extraterrestrial visitors appear to be “harvesting” in various capacities. In his book Communion, famous author and alien abductee Whitley Strieber described how abductees “experienced feeling as if their souls were being dragged from their bodies.” Strieber even discussed one incident of his own where he had experienced “total separation of soul and body,” and reported hearing his alien captors literally say “we recycle souls.” Another peculiar exchange that points to the possible dubious nature of alien-human contact was reported during an abduction encounter that appeared in David M. Jacobs, PhD’s book The Threat. An abductee interviewed for Jacobs’ book recalls telepathically communicating with one of his extraterrestrial captors, and asking what their intentions were. Rather cryptically, he was told “all they’re interested in… no matter what happens at all, is that they control.”

The foreboding circumstances presented within such reports can hardly escape designation within our so-called “evil” category. Still, they may be worthy of further interpretation, as seen from perspectives seeking to define the phenomena more broadly, rather than the strict, cut-and-dry labeling of “good and evil.” Consider the numerous consistencies between reports of UFO abductees and those who have had various sorts of mystic experiences, both self-induced (via entheogenic drugs, meditation, etc) and spontaneous. One common theme would be the perception described by mystics that a “presence” accompanies their meditations, rituals, and other methods of entering altered states. This sometimes even culminates in trans-dimensional “encounters” with sentient beings, seeming so real that no explanation could exist in the mind of the initiate other than a literal meeting with an alien presence having transpired. Mystic experiences are also traditionally rife with descriptions of bodily dismemberment, as well as levitation, out-of-body experiences, tunnels of light, religious iconography, and a host of other things that similarly pepper various ufological literature, especially in the cases where alien abductions have been involved.

Does making associations between the two phenomena in this way challenge the notion that alien abduction is an entirely physical phenomenon? Perhaps so; but more to-point in the present circumstance, it illustrates the commonality between mystic experiences–many of which involve circumstances that could certainly elicit a sense of separation between soul and body–and the nuts and bolts, primarily medically-oriented alien abduction scenarios which, of no particular surprise here, contain many of the same sort of elements. Perceived in the absence of their mystical counterparts (and interpreted solely in a physical sense), alien abductions could hardly be received as anything but negative or “evil.” And yet, ironically, mystic practitioners have long noted circumstances that are curiously similar within their meditations and dream quests, having merely accepted them as one small part of a greater experience.

In the end I guess, one person’s DMT experience could be another’s demonic UFO abduction.

I’m not sure about this at all about the so-called spirituality of ET entities, or any other ‘spirit’ entity that can cross over from the other side/dimension at will.

Certainly the subject deserves more research on my part if I want to accurately comment on it.

Alien Contact in History: Battle for Our Souls, or a Culture Clash?

hat tip

Jung the Occultist

When people discuss Carl Gustav Jung, it’s generally about his famous split with Freud in 1912, or his theory of cultural archetypes.

But as I’ve been reading about him lately through his 21st Century disciples (Christopher Knowles and Christopher O’Brien..hmm..”Christophers”…), the theory of archetypes and synchronicity (note the “Christ” figures as disciples) bringing “gnosis” (knowledge..heh..another one!) is hard to ‘ignore’ (hah, another one! Okay, stop now).

Well it seems that Jung in the last years of WWII was in the throes of depression and was suffering heart ailments as well. While in a coma after suffering a fall that broke his leg, he had an “out of body experience”:

On 11 February 1944, the 68-year-old Carl Gustav Jung – then the world’s most renowned living psychologist – slipped on some ice and broke his fibula. Ten days later, in hospital, he suffered a myocardial infarction caused by embolisms from his immobilised leg. Treated with oxygen and camphor, he lost consciousness and had what seems to have been a near-death and out-of-the-body experience – or, depending on your perspective, delirium. He found himself floating 1,000 miles above the Earth. Seas and continents shimmered in blue light and Jung could make out the Arabian desert and snow-tipped Himalayas. He felt he was about to leave orbit, but then, turning to the south, a huge black monolith came into view. It was a kind of temple, and at the entrance Jung saw a Hindu sitting in a lotus pos ition. Within, innumerable candles flickered, and he felt that the “whole phantasmagoria of earthly existence” was being stripped away. It wasn’t pleasant, and what remained was an “essential Jung”, the core of his experiences.

He knew that inside the temple the mystery of his existence, of his purpose in life, would be answered. He was about to cross the threshold when he saw, rising up from Europe far below, the image of his doctor in the archetypal form of the King of Kos, the island site of the temple of Asclepius, Greek god of medicine. He told Jung that his departure was premature; many were demanding his return and he, the King, was there to ferry him back. When Jung heard this, he was immensely disappointed, and almost immediately the vision ended. He experienced the reluctance to live that many who have been ‘brought back’ encounter, but what troubled him most was seeing his doctor in his archetypal form. He knew this meant that the physician had sacrificed his own life to save Jung’s. On 4 April 1944 – a date numerologists can delight in – Jung sat up in bed for the first time since his heart attack. On the same day, his doctor came down with septicæmia and took to his bed. He never left it, and died a few days later.

Jung was convinced that he hadn’t simply hallucinated, but that he had been granted a vision of reality. He had passed outside time, and the experience had had a palpable effect on him. For one thing, the depression and pessimism that overcame him during WWII vanished. But there was something more. For most of his long career, he had impressed upon his colleagues, friends, and reading public that he was, above all else, a scientist. He was not, he repeated almost like a mantra, a mystic, occultist, or visionary, terms of abuse his critics, who rejected his claims to science, had used against him. Now, having returned from the brink of death, he seemed content to let the scientist in him take a back seat for the remaining 17 years of his life.

Although Jung had always believed in the reality of the ‘other’ world, he had taken care not to speak too openly about this belief. Now, after his visions, he seemed less reticent. He’d had, it seems, a kind of conversion experience, and the interests the world-famous psychologist had hitherto kept to himself now became common knowledge. Flying saucers, astrology, parapsychology, alchemy, even predictions of a coming “new Age of Aquarius”: pronouncements on all of these dubious subjects – dubious at least from the viewpoint of modern science – flowed from his pen. If he had spent his career fending off charges of mysticism and occultism – initially triggered by his break with Freud in 1912 – by the late 1940s he seems to have decided to stop fighting. The “sage of Küsnacht” and “Hexenmeister of Zürich”, as Jung was known in the last decade of his life, had arrived.
ALL IN THE FAMILY
Yet Jung’s involvement with the occult was with him from the start – literally, it was in his DNA. His maternal grandfather, Rev. Samuel Preiswerk, who learned Hebrew because he believed it was spoken in heaven, accepted the reality of spirits, and kept a chair in his study for the ghost of his deceased first wife, who often came to visit him. Jung’s mother Emilie was employed by Samuel to shoo away the dead who distracted him while he was working on his sermons.

She herself developed medium istic powers in her late teens. At the age of 20, she fell into a coma for 36 hours; when her forehead was touched with a red-hot poker she awoke, speaking in tongues and prophesying. Emilie continued to enter trance states throughout her life, in which she would communicate with the dead. She also seems to have been a ‘split personality’. Jung occasionally heard her speaking to herself in a voice he soon recognised was not her own, making profound remarks expressed with an uncharacteristic authority. This ‘other’ voice had inklings of a world far stranger than the one the young Carl knew.

This ‘split’ that Jung had seen in his mother would later appear in himself. At around the age of 12, he literally became two people. There was his ordinary boyhood self, and someone else. The ‘Other,’ as Carl called him, was a figure from the 18th century, a masterful character who wore a white wig and buckled shoes, drove an impressive carriage, and held the young boy in contempt. It’s difficult to escape the impression that in some ways Jung felt he had been this character in a past life. Seeing an ancient green carriage, Jung felt that it came from his time. his later notion of the collective unconscious, that psychic reservoir of symbols and images that he believed we inherit at birth, is in a sense a form of reincarnation, and Jung himself believed in some form of an afterlife. Soon after the death of his father, in 1896 when Jung was 21, he had two dreams in which his father appeared so vividly that he considered the possibility of life after death. In another, later dream, Jung’s father asked him for marital advice, as he wanted to prepare for his wife’s arrival. Jung took this as a premonition, and his mother died soon after. And years later, when his sister Gert rude died – a decade before his own near-death experience – Jung wrote that “What happens after death is so unspeakably glorious that our imagination and feelings do not suffice to form even an approximate conception of it.”

Hmm..apparently the whole family could communicate with “spirits”, what ever spirits are.

Are they just glimpses of other dimensions, or are they projected “archetypes?”

It’s hard to say from this article, but I would conjecture that given Jung’s, and others OBE’s that what ever our core beings (consciousness) are, they exist in another reality.

And the collective subconscious is capable of projecting “archetypes” that can become real and solid.

Pretty deep.

The Occult World of CG Jung

The Natural Alphabet / “St. Paddy’s Day” is Ancient Egyptian

A bit of a history lesson here; how did our modern alphabet evolve?

Well, according to this article, “it’s all in nature”:

The precursor to many of the characters in our modern script are found in the pictogram hieroglyphs of ancient Egypt. The symbol for the letter ‘A’, in its earliest representation, depicted the image of the deified ox–which came to represent ‘the great one’ or ‘the creator’ in subsequent cultures. So it remained, as the symbol became adopted by the Greeks and Romans in a more rudimentary form, called ‘Alpha’–still signifying a supreme position today.

Not all the letters that make up our current alphabet are thought to trace back to forms from nature, however. The letter ‘B’, for example, is traced back to a pictogram of a house–its dimpled center once representing a doorway. Likewise, the early symbol for ‘C’ resembles a sling, though some speculate it might depict the hump of a camel.

the letter d imageThe letter ‘D’ in its Proto-Semitic was often represented by the pictogram of a fish, though as the symbol was adopted by the Phoenician, it seems that only the triangle-shaped tail was preserved. That triangle would become more precise as the Greek letter ‘Delta’, until the Romans rotated the shape slightly and rounded one of the pointed sides.

Very interesting. Although I don’t think the original Lascaux Cave artists intended nothing more than preserving the power of their animal spirits.

Then again, isn’t that what written words do?

How Nature Inspired the Alphabet

hat tip

….

Sometimes I haunt Chris Knowles’ The Secret Sun for a dose of Jungian Symbolism and today Saint Patrick’s Day gets the treatment:

Well, it’s that time again- the Liberalia. Some of you may know it as St. Patrick’s Day, but it was originally sacred to Dionysus (or Liber Pater as he came to be known after the clampdown on the Bacchanalia), as those who’ve read The Secret History of St. Patrick’s Day know. And this brings us back to Osiris, the father (or Pater) of the Egyptian Mystery Trinity. Here’s a sneak preview for those who haven’t read the article:

In Egyptian mythology, Osiris was killed on the 17th day of Athyr, the third month of the ancient calendar.

3/17 is also the date of a Masonically-created holiday, St. Patrick’s Day. The story has it that the holiday was established by high level Freemason, George Washington, allegedly to reward Irish soldiers in the Continental Army. But “St. Paddy’s” has traditionally been a very minor Saint’s day in Ireland. Considering that the day has become America’s defacto Bacchanal (which takes us back to Osiris) it’s worth noting some of the parallels of this day with Solar mythology.

• Osiris was believed to be the source of barley, which was used for brewing beer in Egypt.

• It’s customary to wear green on St. Patrick’s Day and Osiris was known as the “Green Man”

• The root word of Patrick is pater, the Latin word meaning father. Osiris is the father in the Egyptian Trinity.

I’ve been so busy I haven’t been able to get the fixings for boiled dinner– I suppose we can postpone the festivities until the weekend when I can make some fresh soda bread (the stuff at the store is always stale) and get a better deal on the corned beef.

Mmmm..soda bread. I forgot about that.

I wonder if the store will have anymore left when I go home from work today?

It’s funny how the ancient gods and their holidays got integrated into “Christian” culture over the centuries.

Of course the people in charge of buying school textbooks in Texas would deny that to the end…

It’s Saint Osiris Day Again!

British UFO Comments

England’s Ministry of Defense last year adopted a policy of releasing old UFO reports, complete or not.

Recently they released some reports that supposedly had “rude comments” removed:

The previously secret documents were vetted for insulting remarks, as well as references to military technology.

UFO UFO claimants mocked

This latest memo, dated 2007, details how reports from the public should be dealt with.

It concludes: ‘The MoD is aware of no clear evidence to prove or disprove the existence of aliens, and consequently the files are considerably less exciting than the ‘‘industry’’ surrounding the UFO phenomena would like to believe.’

That’s nice of them to censor for rude comments. Politeness matters!

UFO files censored… for insults

Hmm..triangular UFOs have taken the place of the traditional shaped Saucers?

I don’t know about that. But according to the aforementioned released British MoD UFO files, this seems to be the case:

[…]It is one of the most memorable opening sequences on film: A small craft is being pursued through outer space by a massive triangular vessel, which passes over viewers’ heads with a roar that made audiences at screenings of “Star Wars,” in 1977, feel something like dolphins submerged under a passing aircraft carrier. So powerful was the image that it may have haunted some viewers’ dreams — or waking visions.

We were reminded of this scene on Thursday when the British government released its fifth and largest collection of files about unidentified flying objects, which officials in Britain continued to monitor for years after the United States government stopped in 1969 (or claimed to have stopped — some conspiracy theorists think there are still men in black keeping tabs on little green men). It’s fascinating stuff for lovers of the unexplained, loaded with stories of eerie lights in the sky, descriptions of vessels that defy the laws of physics, and warnings of alien viruses. One of the more compelling reports comes from a man in South Wales, who in January 1997 claimed that his car was enveloped by a beam of light while he was driving home at night. He emerged from the car to total silence, and began to feel ill. When the beam passed, his car was filthy and he developed a skin condition that required treatment.

Maybe it’s coincidental that the TV series “The X-Files,” which prominently featured alien abductions and viruses from outer space, was then a top-rated show on BBC2. Indeed, the British records, which detail sightings from 1994 to 2000, show that perceptions about UFOs might owe more to Hollywood than previously thought.

David Clarke, author of a book on the British UFO records, notes that the shapes of these objects have changed over time. In the 1940s and 1950s, UFOs were usually described by those who saw them as “flying saucers” — round or disk-shaped objects. At the time, movies such as “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (1951) and “Forbidden Planet” (1956) reinforced the idea that futuristic spacecraft would look like Frisbees. Modern sightings, by contrast, involve different shapes, particularly triangles. Which is where that “Star Wars” sequence, and countless other Hollywood depictions of spaceships in all shapes and sizes, come in.

It’s worth noting that the most futuristic-looking of military aircraft, the Stealth bomber, is shaped like a triangle, so these perceptions aren’t necessarily or solely coming from Hollywood. But it does seem that when we see unusual and unexplainable lights in the sky, our brains leap to interpret them by forming familiar images of the sort we’ve been conditioned by science-fiction flicks to expect. That doesn’t mean people who see such things are crazy or that they’re hoaxers, only that they’re human.

The triangular UFO memes have been strong lately, and not just in England.

This is a ‘chicken and the egg’ conundrum, do we feed the image or does it feed us?

Jung would’ve loved it!

UFOs, across the pond

Tinfoil Tuesday: Nibiru Nadda

It’s been a long time since I posted something about Nibiru. Mainly because there hasn’t been anything new to write about.

Now there’s still many folks who claim that Nibiru is coming and the end of the world is nigh in 2012, since Nibiru is going to have a close fly-by of the Earth at that date.

And because the ancient Mayans predicted the event with their long-count calendar. It happens to end at that time.

I’ll admit I was on the Nibiru train for a while and it fits in my interest with ancient astronauts.

But when there hasn’t been a telescopic sighting of the planet and even if the governments of the Earth are covering it up, there hasn’t been any gravitational influence of a large planetary body disturbing the planets of the Solar System and our planet.

You can’t hide the laws of physics.

So with that little tidbit, I’ll offer up this post from The Interstellar Housewife, who also is a little disappointed with Nibiru:

Back in 2001-2003 when everyone was screaming about Nibiru, I was caught up in the new Mars photos of the Cydonea region, waiting to see if that damn mound was a friggin’ face or not. It wasn’t, in the end (though Hoagland certainly stood his ground for a bit).

Outwardly, these seemed like two fairly separate camps — Camp A. being those people in to new martian photos and hopeful of data showing traces of microbial life, if not photos of some extinct civilization and Camp B

Oh, it wasn’t a natural connection, to be sure. It required a bit of — um, leniency. And manipulation. Personally, I never bought into half of the stuff flying around at the time. I did entertain the Nibiru idea, briefly, because some of it seemed plausible enough – but only up until the part were it was a hollow planet that played home-world to a race of beings called the Annunaki, who just could not get enough gold!


The other part I didn’t buy was the prophesied impact date of 2003 — for one, because IT WASN’T IN THE MOTHERLUVIN’ SKY. And I’m pretty sure something that big would have been very visible in the years just prior to ’03.

This wasn’t the first time these kinds of idea poked about. In fact, these are mostly old ideas. But a resurgence surfaced sometime after Y2K, and names that had not been uttered in many moons were suddenly all the rage – particularly Sitchin and Von Daniken. The theories were interesting, admittedly, but it was just a bit much for me. It did, however, appear to over-saturate the online UFO community and after a while, my bullshit alarm was going off left and right with each new addition to an increasingly bloated theory.

So, I ducked out. I just walked away from that whole scene and buried those interests in the back of my mind, next to that copy of Redbook with Molly Ringwald on the cover that I can never seem to find in the labyrinth of boxes that is my basement.

When I’d had about enough of my self-imposed exile, I didn’t expect to find the same arguments going on, half a decade after Nibiru didn’t show up (and if you say it’s coming in 2012, I swear I’m going to stab myself in the face). But what was more crazy was that it was seeping into the mainstream, foaming up around the edges — and what was once a theory slapped together with odd-shaped pieces and a whole lot of imagination, was now a kind of religion.

And as I said, I entertained the idea for a brief time, to imagine what it all might have been like back in the day if it were true, but I eventually let it go. I’m not anti-ancient astronauts or anything. I think it’s certainly something to think about, and just as good as any creation theory floating around in the minds of mortals — I just find common interpretations of it sorta sketchy.

If the whole basic concept happens to be true, I feel safe in saying that its probably quite a bit different from what individuals like Sitchin claim. People (and especially authors) tend to inject their wants and needs into a subject they feel passionately about and Zacharia was no exception. In reading The Twelfth Planet, I noticed very quickly that he leads the reader a bit too much in his own personal direction, with definitive statements about what it is we are seeing on ancient stone tablets (I think he even claimed one tablet was obviously a depiction of a laser — really??).

Personally, I think a lot of those mysterious etchings and whatnot, do look like flying vehicles. They strike me as exceptionally odd, interesting and spectacular. Am I ready to say they are definitely otherworldly vehicles? No.

I mean, how do you prove something like that, anyway? We can’t even prove current extra-terrestrial visitation, let alone biblical stories — so what kind of chance does something like this stand? To the individual buying that bag of magic beans, it probably shouldn’t matter. I have a lot of beliefs that would cause even the sketchiest UFO zombie to go into permanent shock, but I can’t and won’t even attempt to prove any of them or direct someone else to believe as i do.

And this is my issue with people like Bob Dean, Hoagland (well, Hoagland for myriad reasons), and about 30 billion others. These voices present their opinions with an authority they don’t really have. Big deal right? Well sure, but what about the people who are just walking into this and hear these ‘gurus’ throwing around mysterious credentials and super-secret insider information (*cough*Wilcock*cough*). Some of these guys really sound good if you’re not privy to their backgrounds or if you don’t look close enough.

I hate to drop the evidence-bomb on you, but since this post is relatively F-Bomb free, I’m going to — and I will even paraphrase Sagan, to boot! If you’re going to make extraordinary claims, you better have some extraordinary evidence. Otherwise I’m going to sound like a broken record asking “well, how do you know?” “Well, how do you know?” “Well, how do you know?”…

Well? How do you?

Now, before you get your panties in a bunch, I’m not disputing evidence for UFOs. I feel there is evidence. — and some fabulous testimonial from exceptionally credible individuals. I just don’t think there is enoughany UFOs are extra terrestrial. Of course, I believe that some probably are. That’s a personal opinion, and a lot less iron-fisty than me saying “Extra terrestrials are definitely here and they really love gold!”

If there was ever any question if I was a Starchild, it should be made clear that I find gold tacky. I’m more a sterling silver kind of gal. And yes, I’m being an ass.

In closing, ancient Sumerian text is probably best understood by ancient Sumerians. Yes, we can learn a lot from them, but translations, in general, have never been perfect, even between our common known languages — so, claims of an accurate translation of meanings and symbols without allowing much margin for error, is a wee bit foolish. Think about the Bible translation disputes, for example. This is pretty much the same thing — and the bible is much younger than Sumerian tablets!

Ok, I’m off to find that Redbook!

Well, I don’t do Redbook thank fate, but my interests have taken a more mundane flavor lately.

Too bad about that Face on Mars!

Ancient Sumerian Secret, Huh?

Kaku on the Science Channel and UFO Disclosure ‘FAIL’

Michio Kaku is considered a radical among his mainstream peers. He has written several books that are at the ‘fringe’ of physics; “Physics of the Impossible“, “Parallel Worlds” and “Hyperspace”  are, but a few of his publications that explore extreme science.

Starting today, Dr. Kaku starts a new television show on the Science Channel called “Sci-Fi Science: Physics of the Impossible” in which he discusses subjects that would’ve been considered “tinfoil hat” a decade ago:

Explore the world of the seemingly impossible with the all-new series SCI FI SCIENCE. Hosted by internationally-renowned physicist and co-founder of string field theory, Dr. Michio Kaku, this series poses the idea that science fiction may not be so far from science fact. Examine topics that currently seem so far out… of the realm of possibility, such as invisibility cloaks, teleportation, time travel and more.

Is he a self promoter? Sure. He has to be in order to get the general public interested in science. Especially hard to understand esoteric physics.

Clips of Kaku’s show on the Science Channel

___

UFO ‘disclosure’ from the US government has been a long sought after endeavor by the likes of Steven Greer, Alfred Webre and Michael Salla for decades. Recently, disclosure was supposed to happen around Thanksgiving.

But of course, it never happened.

Fortean/symbologist Christopher Knowles has a take on ‘disclosure’ that is finding more fans among the more serious students on the UFO subject; ‘ultra’ or as Mac Tonnies observed, ‘crypto-terrestrials’:

Well, another ‘disclosure event’ has come and gone. I haven’t really been keeping track of how many there have been, but it seems as long as I’ve been paying attention to the UFO phenomena people have been making remarkable predictions of upcoming disclosures that have yet to come to pass. I do remember that expectation was running very high in the mid-90s, and UFOs were everywhere in the media, but…nothing. I wasn’t plugged into the pre-Internet UFO community per se, but I know there were a number of predictions (made by people like Jeanne Dixon and Phyllis Schlemmer) that some kind of massive UFO landing was due in the late 70s and nothing came of that either, obviously.

Anyone who approaches the UFO phenomena with an open mind comes to realize that whatever it is, it’s a much deeper, much, much older and much more prevalent reality than what the mainstream media- at least in certain western nations- would ever have us believe. It’s only natural then to assume that people in government are aware of it, have access to greater knowledge about it than you or I, and are intentionally keeping it all from us. But there’s also the possibility that the government knows about the phenomenon but also knows there’s nothing it can do about it, which some of the evidence speaks to as well. And governments generally don’t like to admit their impotence in the face of a superior power.
[…]

If these UFOs and aliens aren’t simply some kind of perpetual human delusion (which I’m not necessarily discounting), than I’ve personally never seen any evidence to dissuade me from the ‘ultraterrestrial hypothesis’- that we’re dealing with some kind of parallel reality to our own. Those massive interstellar distances might not be daunting in sci-fi but are quite a bit more so in sci-fact. The sheer scale of sightings and the millennia over which they’ve taken place tends to mitigate against ETs jetting back and forth from Sirius or the Pleiades, at least in my opinion. Which by default bolsters the UT hypothesis, if one is so inclined.

I’m partial to the Igigi theory myself, since all of the sightings and anecdotes we’ve heard strike me as some kind of monitoring/surveillance. Abductions/contact/experience reports speak less to the old “take me to your leader” trope one might expect of extrasolar visitors, and more a kind of “let’s keep an eye on the Project” kind of behavior you’d expect of some stay-behind monitors. It sounds cold, but it all strikes me as the kind of contact that human scientists have with fauna in the wild, more than any kind of preparation for a massive landing at the UN.

I’ve studied the UFO phenomenon on and off for over thirty years and have often wondered why the ‘aliens’ are almost always ‘humanoid’ in structure, especially when current theories of exo-biology claims since intelligence is an ‘accident’, other intelligent creatures in the Universe would just as soon look like vacuum cleaners?

Like everyone else, I just have an opinion and chances are, we’ll never know the complete truth.

The Secret Sun: The Exegesis: Disclosure and Its Discontents

Illuminati Proven by Physics and Siberian Skulls

Via the Mysterious Universe:

In The Book of the Damned, Charles Fort opined, “I think we’re property. I should say we belong to something.” Reasonable people disagree about who owns us: an alien race of reptilians or the even more alien breed known as the Illuminati.

Either way, science has recently confirmed that there is in fact a small group of, well, let’s call them overlords, who own pretty much everything in the world.

 

In a paper described by LiveScience as “.. the first clear picture of the global concentration of financial power,” Stefano Battiston and James Glattfelder, physicists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, use the data crunching tools of physics to analyze financial markets of 48 countries and  extract the “backbone” of each country’s financial market. These backbones represented the owners of 80 percent of a country’s market capital, yet consisted of remarkably few shareholders.

  “You start off with these huge national networks that are really big, quite dense,” Glattfelder said. “From that you’re able to … unveil the important structure in this original big network. You then realize most of the network isn’t at all important.”

By the physicists’ calculations, The Capital Group Companies are the single most influential controlling shareholder in the world, figuring prominently in the control of capital in 32 of 48 countries considered. Ironically, the company was founded in 1931 by Jonathan Bell Lovelace who came away from the stock market crash almost unscathed because “by 1929 he could see no logical relationship between stock market prices and their underlying values” and got his money out.  His timely insight was apparently lost on the majority of present-day traders  who brought us the latest financial meltdown. Unless, of course, they were really acting on the orders of Mr. Lovelace’s  evil spawn, the reigning New World Order.

So, it seems  Charles Fort theory that we are “owned” like “pigs, geese, and cattle” wasn’t so crackpot after all.  And in his Fortean wisdom, he also guessed the “whyness” behind our indentured fate:  “All this has been known, perhaps for ages, to certain ones upon this earth, a cult or order, members of which function like bellwethers to the rest of us, or as superior slaves or overseers, directing us in accordance with instructions received — from Somewhere else — in our mysterious usefulness.”

So much for the ‘hard’ sciences characterizing the ‘real’ world.

All is a mystery!

Physicists Shed Light on Illuminati

h/t

Here’s a video about elongated skulls that were discovered during an archeological dig in Siberia.

One usually associates these finds in South America and it’s the first discovered in Siberia.

An archeologist working the dig estimates the age to the 4th century A.D., but it could be older.

Stay tuned.

http://www.diagonal-view.com/v/371/strange-elongated-skulls-discovered.html

h/t

Grissom/Obama Meme going Viral?

Sure, I’ll help Chris take this viral.

I love a good Masonic Mystery!

Via The Secret Sun:


In the past 36 hours this blog has been bombarded with thousands of hits, after a Drudge Report-type site linked to part one of the Gus Grissom/Barackobamun piece. There were the usual corny old jokes about “tinfoil hats” and all of the rest of the worn-out snark in the comments sections (along with some stunning displays of poor reading comprehension), but that represents only a tiny percentage of the traffic. Having been on the internet for the better part of the last two decades, I recognize defensive ironic distancing when I see it.

What’s more, I’m noticing that other sites are picking up on the meme. It’s too soon to say how resonant the meme will become, but it did get me looking at Obama’s possible Grissom obsession again (and that’s what I was writing about- not a conspiracy, per se.)

In the first few seconds of doing so, I found this speech to the National Academy of Sciences on April 27, 2009. Although it was a more general (read: “boring”) gabfest on science and technology, Barackobamun spoke about his support for the space colonization program:

My budget includes $150 billion over 10 years to invest in sources of renewable energy as well as energy efficiency. It supports efforts at NASA, recommended as a priority by the National Research Council, to develop new space-based capabilities to help us better understand our changing climate.

And he even snuck in the Magic(k) Number:

America’s young people will rise to the challenge if given the opportunity — if called upon to join a cause larger than themselves. We’ve got evidence. You know, the average age in NASA’s mission control during the Apollo 17 mission was just 26. I know that young people today are just as ready to tackle the grand challenges of this century.

So what’s the big deal about this speech? Nothing, really. Except it took place of 5o years to the day after Gus Grissom was chosen by NASA for the Mercury Project.

Obama-logo-712332

 

Grissom/Obama Meme going Viral?

Freemasonry and the Moon

I couldn’t resist:

Freemasonry: “When man reaches new worlds, Masonry will be there.”

Click for Larger View. Notice the symbolism of the issue as well - Vol. 77, No. 11. Click for Larger View. Notice the symbolism of the issue as well – Vol. 77, No. 11. 

The above was a quote from the December 1969 issue of the The New Age Magazine, the official magazine of the Supreme Council 33° A.&A. Scottish Rite of Freemasonry of the Southern Jurisdiction, Washington, D.C. (See the details here.) Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., 32°, visited the Scottish Rite headquarters at the House of the Temple in Washington, September 16, 1969, after the historic moon landing of Apollo 11, and brought back the Freemasonic flag that he took with him to the moon.

The Apollo program was rife with Masons; they were proud of being involved, and weren’t shy about advertising the fact.

In the November 1969 edition of The New Age Magazine, there is an extensive article by Kenneth S. Kleinknecht, 33°, the Manager of the Apollo Program Command and Service Modules; Deputy Manager, Gemini Program; Manager, Project Mercury.

On page 13, we read:

Note how many of the astronauts themselves are Brother Masons: Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr.; L. Gordon Cooper, Jr.; Donn F. Eisle; Walter M. Schirra; Thomas P. Stafford; Edgar D. Mitchell, and Paul J. Weitz. Before his tragic death in a flash fire at Cape Kennedy on January 27, 1967, Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom was a Mason, too. Astronaut Gordon Cooper, during his epochal Gemini V spaceflight in August of 1965, carried with him an official Thirty-third Degree Jewel and a Scottish Rite flag. Via the lunar plaque, the Masonic ensignia and flag, and the Masonic astronauts themselves – Masonry already is in the space age. Can we doubt Freemasonry and its spiritual relevance to the modern era when even its material representatives have today made historic inroads into the infinite expanses of outer space?

 

Back then, Freemasonry wasn’t shy about admitting that the “Craft” is essentially a spiritual endeavor, either. In fact, right before Kleinknecht writes some bios on the Masonic astronauts (as well as Mason James Edwin Webb, the NASA administrator from 1961-68), he includes these words: “The mission of the Craft has always been one of salvation, but until now its field of endeavor was the individual and the bringing of him to the light. Masonry cannot think in these terms now. All men everywhere must hear our message or all men everywhere will perish” (ibid., pp. 15-16; my emphasis).

Kenneth S. Kleinknecht, by the way, was/is the brother of C. Fred Kleinknecht, 33°, Sovereign Grand Commander, The Supreme Council, 33° (Mother Council of the World), Southern Jurisdiction, USA, Washington.

Illuminati Conspiracy Archive