Tag Archives: war

Son of Dyna-Soar

Next year the Air Force will launch atop of an Atlas V rocket an unmanned space plane code named “X-37”.

It will have a 4′ x 7′ cargo bay and extensive improvements that was learned during the space shuttle era.

But the X-37 has a deeper ancestry than the space shuttle that reaches back to the beginnings of the space program:

The X-37 embodies other modifications of shuttle technology. All shuttle-era hydraulics have been eliminated; the new spaceplane’s flight controls will be operated electromechanically, making the X-37 fly-by-wire. Unlike the shuttle, with its one vertical stabilizer, the X-37 has two short diagonal ones, called ruddervators—surfaces that combine the functions of rudders and elevators. These reduce the amount of propellant needed to handle trim and control during the high-speed, high-angle-of-attack reentry, and provide room for a centerline speed brake that manages the vehicle’s glide energy just before landing.

Upon reaching orbit, the craft will deploy a solar array that will power batteries. Those batteries have replaced hydrogen fuel cells, the shuttle’s power source in orbit. The vehicle will maneuver in space powered by a combination of nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine. Theoretically, the X-37 could rendezvous with other satellites of interest to the Air Force, friendly or otherwise.

If the X-37 is to carry out such national security missions, its roots will extend back beyond the space shuttle, to earlier spaceplanes. Says Mark Lewis: “I would draw a heritage not only to the shuttle, but to my very favorite program that never was: the X-20.”

A follow-on to the X-15 rocketplane, which didn’t have the power to get to orbit, the X-20 Dyna-Soar spaceplane, initiated in 1957, would have ridden a massive Titan III booster all the way to orbit if needed, and carried a pilot. (Neil Armstrong was one NASA test pilot selected to fly it, but in 1962 he transferred to the Apollo program.) Dyna-Soar would have given the Air Force a manned system that could have filled a variety of needs: research, reconnaissance, or even attack. It was designed to reach any target in the world in 45 minutes, deliver a weapon, and glide to a friendly base. Its altitude and hypersonic speed would have made it very difficult to intercept.

While this type of capability sounded like something the Air Force needed, the service had difficulty justifying it. NASA was making progress with blunt-body capsules that reentered the atmosphere without the need for pilot control, and intercontinental ballistic missiles were dominating the nuclear delivery mission. A controlled-reentry spaceplane puzzled Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara; he directed the Air Force to study whether concepts such as NASA’s Gemini could handle some of the roles better. In December 1963, shortly after prime contractor Boeing started building the vehicle and after about $660 million had been spent, McNamara killed the X-20.

I’m not surprised that McNamara killed the Dina-Soar program. Like all short-sighted politico types, he only saw the next war for empire and resources on the horizon.

Not above it.

Space Shuttle Jr.

 

Classic Sci-Fi Reviews: “The Forever War” & “Orbitsville”

This week’s classic sci-fi review is Joe Haldeman’s “The Forever War” and Bob Shaw’s “Orbitsville.”

Originally serialized in Analog Science Fiction/Fact Magazine in 1974, The Forever War essentially was a critique of Vietnam. But put any “conflict” in it’s place during the past 60 years, it makes no difference.

My re-read was a pleasant one and although the premise of interstellar travel in the early 21st century is obviously dated, the topic of unnecessary brutal violence and the sheer stupidity of war wasn’t dated at all.

In fact, the striking similarities between what is happening today and the book is downright frightening. Instead of fighting alien “Taurans”, we are fighting alien “Taliban” and “extremists” (the history of the Crusades isn’t lost here either, i.e., “Muslims”).

Needless to say, war is always against “The Other”, i.e. who is not “Us.”

Also the UN is the central government in the book. That prediction failed, but the present corporate/financial paradigm more than nicely makes up for it, since the world is on a war economy, riddled with social chaos and little employment.

Sound familiar?

Contrary to the Iron Mountain Report, war is a waste and it’s shit.

………………………………………………

Orbitsville was another serialized novel I read in 1974, this time in Galaxy Science Fiction.

Oddly, it took me a very long time to even find this book, the library interchange I use didn’t even have it in it’s file, so I had to use the WorldCat exchange. Eventually it turned up at Tulane University, New Orleans!

This was one of the books I wanted to re-read for two years, just for sentimental reasons. And to see if it offered the same thrill.

It was a simple book, a space opera that used the “large enigma” theme and the simple starships were able to bypass the Einsteinian light-speed barrier because his assumptions about time diliation turned out to be wrong after objects passed 20% light-speed.

It wasn’t terrible at all and was full of action, mainly chase scenes.  The character development was bad however, but the description of the Dyson sphere, its enigmatic creators and solar system made up for it.

At the time the novel came out however, Niven’s “Ringworld” and Pohl and Williamson’s “The Farthest Star” were already out featuring their own versions of the “large enigma” theme popular in 1970s sci-fi, and the critics pounded on Shaw’s book because of its simplicity.

In my opinion, Bob Shaw is one of the most under-rated authors of the era and from what I read from reviews of his other works, he didn’t have a stinker in the bunch.

Unfortunately he died during the early 1990s in his early sixties.

I’m sure he had more tales to tell.